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Home Forums HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Vet visit and bloodwork

  • This topic has 3sd replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 8 months ago by Wick.
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  • #1322990
    Pangu
    Participant

    So I’m taking my bunny to the vet for the first time. Only had him for two months and he’s 4 months old. He seems healthy so this visit is intended to just be a check-up. Im wondering if it’s possible that he could be too young for bloodwork or injections, in case the vet suggests it. I’m going to the Avian and Exotic Center for Medicine in NYC and I was told all their doctors have worked with rabbits, but I just want to be cautious about needles and injections etc.
    What do you guys think? If the vet suggests bloodwork should I do it or not?
    Could 4 months be too young for that or not?


    #1894342
    Bunny House
    Participant

    Bloodwork doesn’t hurt since it gives a base line for the animal when it’s healthy. They might say he is too young for it so they might have you come back when he gets neutered to do bloodwork before the surgery to make sure he’s healthy. We don’t have vaccines in the US so there won’t be any injections.


    #1894350
    Pangu
    Participant

    ThaNk you!


    #1894351
    Wick
    Moderator

    It’s natural to be weary about needles and injections, but even so, yes, it is scary to think about for your young rabbit! Thinking about stress levels and the effects is a good mindset to have.

    Thankfully, vet care for rabbits have come a long way when going to rabbit-experienced vets. Giving shots and getting blood samples are sometimes required, as BH mentions. Some countries require vaccines, and wherher it’s baseline or critical testing blood work, those are done pretty routinely.

    Now in terms of urgency, I think the only risk of not doing it now is miss detecting any sort of early detection of genetic issues perhaps. Blood work can sometimes reveal infections, poorly functioning organs, etc.. usually however, owners see symptoms then do a test, because blindly testing at random intervals is costly and probability, especially for younger rabbits, is low. There are always exceptions, but a part of me wonders if detection of problems that occur so early on and don’t show signs would indicate something treatable. This is all just my thoughts though, no medical training.

    So my gut is it’s not necessary. If you have the funds and want a baseline, which is useful to have eventually, than that’s fine though! If the vet is experienced, it should be very minimal risk to your rabbit.


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