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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A To spay or not to? Is my rabbit really spayed? (Female rabbit) (SAD UPDATE)

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    • Thekillergreece
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      I just found out that female rabbits who aren’t spayed, may mount on you, do circles, be aggressive, biting and sort of but very very strangely enough: my rabbit is not that.

      She never bites anyone at all, except in accident circumstances when I have her foot in my hand for prolonged time, she is never aggressive towards to anyone but is very shy when a stranger comes in my house, she sometimes does circles when happy or carrying her food, she never mounted. On top of that, the guide says, unspayed female rabbits are harder to train litter, yet she is.. already trained litter…

      Now I found out they will have 80 chance to develop cancer if unspayed. I immediately asked my friend (who I adopted her from him) if she is spayed, he said no.

      But I never saw any sign of these, what should I do?


    • Brambino
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      This article is very informative

      http://www.rabbitwelfare.co.uk/resources/content/info-sheets/uterine.htm

      I found the risk of uterine cancer was too great for me not to get Bramble spayed.


    • tobyluv
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      Some unspayed rabbits never display the behaviors that you listed, and they are easy to litter box train. It is true that unspayed females have a high chance of developing uterine cancer, which is one reason why it is recommended that they be spayed. Besides behavioral and health reasons, many people want to have their rabbits spayed in case they get a companion for them in the future. It’s best to spay rabbits when they are younger, but older rabbits can be spayed too. The vet would probably perform blood tests before surgery if a rabbit is more than a few years old.


    • Mikey
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      I would have her spayed for the health benefits


    • LittlePuffyTail
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      Agreed. If you can find a rabbit savvy vet, I would def have her spayed. I would suggest, especially if she is an older bunny, a pre-spay exam with the vet to make sure she is healthy enough to undergo the procedure.


    • sarahthegemini
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      Get her spayed. My Buttercup never exhibited any signs of going through puberty either – no mounting, circling (except when excited for pellets!), no aggression, no spraying etc.


    • Lissy
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      I’d advise getting her spayed, I got my bun a couple weeks or so and just had her spayed a few days ago (she’s almost 2 now) and while it’s hard to see them go through it, it probably saved her life as they found out she had developed cysts when she was under. With an 80% chance sometimes it’s just not worth the risk but again it is up to you, my family had a female bun previously (rescued) who was already 3 and we didn’t have her spayed. She lived until age, we suspect 9 (she spent 6 happy years with us but the previous owners didn’t know her exact age but they said 2-3)


    • Thekillergreece
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      And if I do spay her, what should I be aware during recovery and what should I expect from behavioral changes?


    • sarahthegemini
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      Posted By Thekillergreece on 1/20/2017 5:59 AM

      And if I do spay her, what should I be aware during recovery and what should I expect from behavioral changes?

      Buttercup’s behaviour didn’t change at all, with the exception of her litter habits which got better. For recovery, you need to give her pain relief, make sure she eats and keep her warm. 


    • Boston's Mama
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      If I had a female I would definitely spay personally as the risk of cancer is way too high without it imo
      I have a male and he will be neutered – even though I will not be bonding him I still believe it’s best to spay / neuter all rabbits


    • Thekillergreece
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      A schedulement has been planned tomorrow morning for that surgery and all talks. She is ABOUT 2.5 year old, is it good enough for her to get spayed at that age?


    • Azerane
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      Yes, that’s a good age to get spayed. I think it’s more commonly around 4 years when uterine cancer tends to present in females, so it’s good you’ve got in before that time


    • Thekillergreece
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      The schedulement has been placed in Tuesday afternoon because their anesthesia worker was not available. He would be available Tuesday afternoon for the surgery. The vet told me to feed my rabbit ONLY morning (a full bowl of food) and feed her nothing on afternoon prior the surgery. The surgery will be around 18:00 and the food usually holds from 07:00 until 11:00. I think it’s perfectly fine to listen to him?


    • Azerane
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      You should continue to feed your rabbit leading up to the surgery (maybe not in the half hour before to avoid choking), but he needs to keep eating throughout the day to keep his gut working properly. Unlike other animals such as cats and dogs, rabbits cannot vomit so don’t need to be fasted. I would be a little concerned if your vet is advising you to fast your rabbit before surgery when it is unhealthy to do so.

      See point 4 on this page: http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/opcare.html


    • Thekillergreece
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      I always feed my rabbit morning which the food usually holds until 10:00 or 11:00 and sometimes, evening. But regardless, is it good enough if I just feed her morning (Which the food will finish by 10:00 or 11:00)? I dont know what to do, that vet also removed my rabbit’s tooth before due to malfuction and it was perfectly fine afterwards.


    • Vienna Blue in France
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      Pellets can finish about 10 or 11, but hay should never run out!!!

      Rabbits should be able to munch ALL day and night long to keep their digestion system moving.

      Rabbits (unlike cats and dogs) should NEVER be fasted, even before an operation. Mine both ate right up until the last hour before op and the first important thing that a rabbit should do is eat (and poop and drink).

      So please ask your vet again, say that it is important that bun keeps eating (ask him why he wants to fast the bun?) and let us know.


    • Thekillergreece
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      I dont know what fast surgery means in Greek word, he only said we feed her all morning and not afternoon when that’s where the operation begins at 18:00.

      What kind bad does is it? (What will happen if rabbit gets fasted or something)


    • sarahthegemini
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      Don’t stop feeding your rabbit prior to surgery! Feed her pellets as normal and make sure she has plenty of hay to last up until surgery and of corse for afterwards. It’s concerning that your vet is telling you to not feed your bun after the morning :-/ Rabbits need their gut to be moving all the time, if they have food in their tummy prior to surgery then they have a little window where they can wake and adjust after surgery and it won’t be an emergency if they don’t eat immediately.


    • Bam
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      I too feel concern about the instructions not to feed her except in the morning. Was it the vet himself that said it? It’s advice you’d give if the patient was just about any other animal but a rabbit, so could it have been just some sort of a mistake? Buns really need to have food in their tum all the time.


    • Thekillergreece
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      I will call the vet again, Monday. I will feed rabbit until around 15:00 or 16:00. I am sure he knows its about rabbit (He also remove my rabbit’s tooth last year, so I still believe he is experienced, I might be wrong.).

      If all seriousness, what happens if she gets fasted?

      Normally, I always feed her pellets in morning which is enough to last till early afternoon (12:00-13:00) and feed her a bit at late times (20:00).


    • Azerane
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      If she doesn’t eat before surgery she is at much higher risk of GI stasis after surgery because there will be no food in her stomach to move through, especially if she takes a while to eat after surgery. GI stasis can be very dangerous, especially post operation. Letting her eat before surgery helps reduce that risk. As mentioned she should have hay available all day.


    • Thekillergreece
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      I will feed her until 15:00 or so if that’s good idea from you. If vet says that she has to be fasted (Aka, feed her morning only), does it really mean he has no knowledge of the rabbits at all?

      I mean, he is the only surgeon of the veterinary (Behind of 4 other best employees) and was the vet who removed my rabbit’s tooth so I assume he does have experience with rabbits.


    • tobyluv
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      Sometimes, the receptionist or office worker in the vet’s office will tell people to fast their rabbits before surgery, since they may not be very familiar with rabbit care, and only know about dogs and cats. But the vet himself or herself should know that rabbits don’t need to be fasted before surgery. Did you hear this directly from the vet or did the receptionist tell you?


    • Thekillergreece
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      Posted By tobyluv on 1/21/2017 10:18 AM

      Sometimes, the receptionist or office worker in the vet’s office will tell people to fast their rabbits before surgery, since they may not be very familiar with rabbit care, and only know about dogs and cats. But the vet himself or herself should know that rabbits don’t need to be fasted before surgery. Did you hear this directly from the vet or did the receptionist tell you?

      Not sure yet, my father told me it was vet who told him to “Feed her freely in morning but do not feed her at afternoon before surgery”. And if it was vet, what should I do? I mean, if you read previously, it was him and only him who removed my rabbit’s tooth which did give me some confidence that he is experienced with rabbits but the way he told us to feed her in morning but not afternoon is what concerns me now.

      http://www.vetdoc.gr/el-gr/

      That’s the veterinary shop and it’s website (Click the UK flag for English version).


    • Krista
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      Bilbo’s vet gave similar instructions, but it was for his pellets. She said keep him on hay and vegetables, but take his pellets away in the morning because she didn’t want him holding them in his cheeks or something like that. She also said to bring a big bag of hay for post-op. (I have yet to schedule the appointment because my dog is taken all my vet money with his skin condition). Perhaps this is what the vet meant? I mean, Bilbo’s vet isn’t rabbit savvy behavioral-wise since he was doing the back-foot-kicking at her after she restrained him and she thought he was slipping on the floor. I thought it was very obvious that it meant he was insulted. Anyway, she has done several rabbit surgeries. So surgery-wise she’s good. Perhaps your vet just meant pellets?


    • tobyluv
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      I see that your vet sells food for rabbits and other small animals, but I don’t see any mention of medical services for small animals. I only see services that are provided for dogs and cats. That doesn’t mean that your vet is not a good rabbit vet, though. He did successfully perform surgery to remove a tooth for your rabbit. If you have concerns, you can speak with your vet or with his staff to see how many rabbits they treat and how often they perform surgery on them. Hopefully, they will address your concerns and leave you feeling comfortable with the vet’s ability to care for rabbits.

      Here is an article on how to find a good rabbit vet, the questions to ask, etc.

      http://rabbit.org/faq-how-to-find-a-good-rabbit-vet/


    • Thekillergreece
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      I will try and see. I mean, my rabbit had experienced small GI statis and the veterinary was fully equiped medical items for my rabbit and it made her feel well after 3-days taking medications. That’s a first plus before the possibly-experienced vet on rabbits (As he successfully surgically removed a rabbit tooth before.)

      As bam is aware, I only have pellets and been feeding my rabbit with pellets since the day I adopted her. I never had any hays at all, she never ate one. Dont ask how is she hanging there without hay but she’s perfectly fine and all that. 


    • sarahthegemini
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      Posted By Thekillergreece on 1/21/2017 1:22 PM

      I will try and see. I mean, my rabbit had experienced small GI statis and the veterinary was fully equiped medical items for my rabbit and it made her feel well after 3-days taking medications. That’s a first plus before the possibly-experienced vet on rabbits (As he successfully surgically removed a rabbit tooth before.)

      As bam is aware, I only have pellets and been feeding my rabbit with pellets since the day I adopted her. I never had any hays at all, she never ate one. Dont ask how is she hanging there without hay but she’s perfectly fine and all that. 

      Please try and get her to eat hay, it’s absolutely crucial! 


    • tobyluv
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      Is there no hay sold in your area, or some that you can order? Hay is so important for their GI function and for their teeth. If you have any horse stables or horse supply stores near you, they should have some good hay. Horse quality hay is good for rabbits. If you have tried hay and your rabbit wouldn’t eat it, you may need to try other varieties. You can even go outside and pick grass from your yard. Be sure to wash it well.


    • Thekillergreece
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      I’ll check it out, she never had any issues at all though. Any further opinions about vet’s statement and all that?


    • Thekillergreece
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      According to opening hours at their website, the veterinary is closed on tuesday afternoon, yet the surgery is scheduled at the same day, afternoon. Is it alright or suspicious?


    • tobyluv
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      Maybe they mean that the vet clinic is closed for regular appointments on Tuesday afternoon, in order for the vet to perform surgeries.


    • Mikey
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      I would look into it. My vets office will specify what days are closed and what days are surgery days. Such as on their online schedule it says “Monday: 8am to 10pm. Tuesday: 8am to 10pm (surgery 9am to 1pm). Wednesday: 8am to 10pm. ect ect ect”


    • Thekillergreece
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      Tomorrow’s the surgery, I hope everything will be okay.


    • tobyluv
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      You will need to restrict her movement somewhat for the first few days. She especially shouldn’t be jumping up in anything. Make sure that she has a quiet, comfortable place to recuperate and that you have a variety of her favorite veggies on hand. Some rabbits will start eating shortly after surgery, but others don’t seem to want any food. It’s important that she eats, so if she won’t eat food on her own, and it’s been several hours since the surgery, you would have to mix up a pellet mash and syringe feed her or maybe the vet has something like Critical Care that you mix up and feed to her in a syringe. Also make sure that she is warm enough. Sometimes rabbits can feel too cold after surgery. The vet should give her some pain medication while she’s there, which will probably be good for the first day or maybe the first 24 hours, but he should also give you some to take home to give her the next 2 or 3 days.


    • Thekillergreece
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      So, I should do the following:
      1. Request pain relief for my rabbit (What if the vet insists they arent needed?)
      2. Place the cage where rabbit resides next to my radiator. Not close to it.
      3. Restrict her movement, do you mean I have to cage her for 4 whole days? I mean.. Our cage has a door where the rabbit must jump through it, or orthewise “unlock” the cage so she doesnt have to make a slight high jump.
      4. Is it possible to lift her or something?
      5. Is petting good idea?
      6. If she wont eat in morning (After the surgery, the next day), do I have to soft the pellets by filling the bowl with water? (Afterwards, remove the water, same tactic I used when she first time lost her tooth).
      7. If she still wont eat, bring her to vet?
      8. Priority: Food > Poop > Water> Wee?

      What if my rabbit decides to try chew away the stitches?


    • sarahthegemini
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      Posted By Thekillergreece on 1/23/2017 12:46 PM

      So, I should do the following:
      1. Request pain relief for my rabbit (What if the vet insists they arent needed?)
      2. Place the cage where rabbit resides next to my radiator. Not close to it.
      3. Restrict her movement, do you mean I have to cage her for 4 whole days? I mean.. Our cage has a door where the rabbit must jump through it, or orthewise “unlock” the cage so she doesnt have to make a slight high jump.
      4. Is it possible to lift her or something?
      5. Is petting good idea?
      6. If she wont eat in morning (After the surgery, the next day), do I have to soft the pellets by filling the bowl with water? (Afterwards, remove the water, same tactic I used when she first time lost her tooth).
      7. If she still wont eat, bring her to vet?
      8. Priority: Food > Poop > Water> Wee?

      What if my rabbit decides to try chew away the stitches?

      1) They should provide you with some if you ask.

      2) I did that, worked well.

      3) She can have a small pen so she isn’t caged 24/7.

      4) I wouldn’t lift/pick her up.

      5) Petting is fine but don’t overwhelm her. Pet her if she likes it, otherwise leave her be. 

      6) Either use critical care which you can get from the vet or just mash pellets with water to make a kind of paste. 

      7) You’ll have to force feed if she won’t eat by herself. A vet might be able to give can injection to encourage appetite – they did for my Peanut. 

      8) They’re all important so keep an eye on all. Have her favourite foods on hand such as veggies and treats. If she won’t drink much you can just soak her veggies.


    • tobyluv
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      You have to make sure that she isn’t chewing on the stitches. If she is, you would need to get a cone or E-collar from your vet. Those cones can make it hard for rabbits to eat and groom and animals usually hate wearing them, but sometimes they are necessary.

      Could you put some kind of ramp against her cage opening so that she doesn’t have to make a jump into and out of it?  Otherwise, do you have some kind of pen, like an exercise pen, where she would stay at floor level?

      The only time that you might want to pick her up is once a day to take a quick look at the surgery site. You need to make sure that there isn’t any redness or irritation developing. Pick her up slowly and gently, just long enough to get a look.


    • Thekillergreece
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      The surgery will start from 18:00 and finish around 20:00 where she will be picked up, she will be obviously drugged. I took your notes and advices, thanks. I will still need more if anyone else have to share their tips!


    • sarahthegemini
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      Fingers crossed everything goes well, I’m sure it will! Just remember she’s probably going to be a little grouchy/attitudey but don’t take it personally she will come round! One tip that I was told when I had Buttercup and Peanut neutered and spayed is to provide a water bowl as well as a bottle (if you usually use a bottle) Sometimes a bottle is too hard for them and a bowl is so much easier it might encourage drinking. Also, make sure whatever litter you have in the litter trays (I use carefresh) is something that won’t stick to the incision site and of course be extra vigilant with keeping everything clean.


    • Thekillergreece
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      I cleared my cage and placed the … whatever it is called, forgot it’s name, at one corner where she often pees and poops, the rest is clear from it.


    • Bam
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      You might need a hot water bottle or hand warmers (wrapped in towel) to place near her when she comes home. Rabbits can get cold after surgery and that is dangerous for them. She needs to be able to move away from the heat if she doesn’t want it. She will be groggy when she comes home, but that is normal. You shouldn’t leave her be all night but sleep near her cage and get up a few times to check on her and try to get her to eat a little.

      I hope everything goes smoothly and please keep us posted!


    • Thekillergreece
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      I will place the cage next to my bed indeed and try wake up in midnight, open the lights and check on her. I will try a hot water bottle for her to drink. I will let you all know.


    • Thekillergreece
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      She passed away during anesthesia. Her heart couldnt take more…
      The vets (There were 3 of them) claimed they placed her anesthesia, shaved her and she dead afterwards. They tried their best to save her but to no avail, her heart stopped. They all were sad and tried to make me feel better to cope over her death. My grandparents said “Pfft, you will get a new one” that I almost beat them down due to my anger and saddened state.. Regardless, I dig her a grave at my house’ yard and placed her in.. I dont know what I do, I even had plans to get a dog and have them together playing and sort of but now.. I am feeling a bit better as time passes by because:
      1. It was either now or later. Now (With chances of loss, she would not suffer) Later (Suffer a lot from cancer)
      2. Some people helped me cope over her death.


    • Azerane
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      Oh no, I am so very sorry It’s very sad to hear that she didn’t make it through the anaesthetic.


    • Vienna Blue in France
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      Oh no, Killer Greece – I am so sorry she didn’t make it through…
      The only consolation is that she went to sleep gently and just didn’t wake up – so she did not suffer at all.


    • tobyluv
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      I’m very sorry about the loss of your sweet bunny.


    • sarahthegemini
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      Oh my goodness, such sad news


    • Thekillergreece
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      Thanks for the condolences, I am just not sure if I should get another new rabbit or go buy a dog instead. I liked that mix lionhead breed but I doubt there are any of them in the stores. I dont know.


    • Vienna Blue in France
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      Glad you are taking it quite well.

      Personally, me ? I would find a ‘recommended’ rabbit-knowledgeable vet before I’d get another bunny….


    • Thekillergreece
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      Posted By Vienna Blue in France on 1/24/2017 1:54 PM

      Glad you are taking it quite well.

      Personally, me ? I would find a ‘recommended’ rabbit-knowledgeable vet before I’d get another bunny….

      I am sure he is experienced, she dead during anesthesia and there were already risks involved.


    • Vienna Blue in France
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      Yes, of course, you are right – it can be a risky procedure


    • Ellie from The Netherlands
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      I’m so sorry for your loss Operations are always risky on rabbits, although through new techniques mortality rates are lower than ever before. So sorry that your sweet bun didn’t survive the anaesthetic.
      It may be best to postpone making the decision until you’re through the grieving process. No animal can ever replace a lost pet. I’m sure every bunny owner here grieves with you!


    • Mikey
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      Posted By Thekillergreece on 1/24/2017 1:56 PM

      Posted By Vienna Blue in France on 1/24/2017 1:54 PM

      Glad you are taking it quite well.

      Personally, me ? I would find a ‘recommended’ rabbit-knowledgeable vet before I’d get another bunny….

      I am sure he is experienced, she dead during anesthesia and there were already risks involved.

      I know this is bad timing and im sorry for that, but many knowledgeable vets recommend a blood test done before the surgery to ensure the rabbits body can actually handle anesthesia. This vet did not, and also displayed other signs of not being fully knowledgeable towards rabbits (telling you not to feed her, which could also kill her in time or cause pain). Before getting another rabbit, if that is what you choose to do, it would be best to find a different vet

      She was not in pain when she died, and she had a loving life with a loving owner. You did what you could to give her the best life she deserved, and she knows that

      (((((Binky free, sweet bunny)))))


    • sarahthegemini
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      I agree with Vienna and Mikey – don’t get another rabbit til you find one with adequate experience (one that doesn’t recommend fasting prior to surgery for example)


    • LittlePuffyTail
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      I’m so very sorry for your loss. We know how hard it is to lose a special bunny. ((Hugs))

      ((((Binky Free)))))


    • Wascally Wabbits
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      I am so sorry! She did not suffer if it brings any comfort. I can tell you love her very much and she would know that.

      {{Binky free, sweet bunny}}


    • Shannie1027
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      Very sorry for your loss. I too lost one of my bunnies to spay. I actually assisted during surgery. I was a vet tech at the time. They both made it through surgery fine, but one passed during recovery. At least this way she did not suffer at all. They really just go to sleep. I know how you feel I was devastated!!! You were a wonderful mommy to her. I think the risks are just so high. Even in my situation, one did fine, one did not. It’s hard to know what to do. When the time is right, you will know and go get another baby. Or rescue one already spayed? Def find a good bunny vet. Again I am so so sorry. Don’t be too hard on yourself.

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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A To spay or not to? Is my rabbit really spayed? (Female rabbit) (SAD UPDATE)