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BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!  Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES 

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

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Forum DIET & CARE Mat prevention

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    • mia
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        My young Lionhead has very long fine mane. She’s the first bun to ever get mats in my care – i.e. buns may come in with mats but after I get them cleaned up, it never happens again. This bun though, has had them a few times developing and hiding behind her ears, one on each side. Hay seems to be a huge contributor. I’ve been able to get them out and only once had to slightly snip a little bit to help resolve. It’s not a big deal for me to work through the mats. However, I don’t know how uncomfortable it is for her when she has them and if I need to take more actions.

        Was wondering if there are thought processes/decision paths of, at what point should one consider cutting fur for prevention? I’ve always felt natural was better and this was a silly thing to do but maybe in this case…


      • LBJ10
        Moderator
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          If the mat is small and it isn’t pulling the skin, then it isn’t a big deal. I would always just snip it out. If needed, a small personal trimmer (like a beard trimmer) could get one that was close to the skin.

          I don’t think there is harm in doing a little preventative trimming. I mean, it’s not like lionhead fur is “natural” anyway.


        • mia
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            What do you mean by pulling the skin? Like as long as there’s no bald spot?

            Her fur is very dense, especially the mane, so the clumps are hard to find. Best case clump were about a quarter size when found while the worse case was 2.5 quarter sized in length for each one.

            I guess the buns I’ve seen trimmed/shaved just look so funny/strange…


            • LBJ10
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                When the mats are very tight and close to the skin, they can actually cause pulling and sores. I seriously doubt you would let your bun get to that point though.


            • Azerane
              Moderator
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                Daily or every other day brush the problem areas to prevent the mats forming.

                If that’s not working then definitely running it shaving the fur should help.

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            Forum DIET & CARE Mat prevention