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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Is This How Head Tilt Starts?

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    • bbbunzo
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      Hi guys!

      Does anyone have some information or experience with head tilt? I posted last week under “Ear Bumps with Yeast Infection and Possible Mites?” but now I’ve noticed Allen leaning a little sometimes when he’s resting. 

      He doesn’t do it every time he rests, sometimes his head is straight up and down. I feel like I only saw him do this for the first time in the last couple days and given his recent history with the ear infection, I’m really worried he’s developing head tilt. 

      I’ve seen him lean to either side – is head tilt specifically to one side or the other or can it be both? He also just started Revolution the other night – could that be causing this? Thank you!!!!


    • bbbunzo
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      Sorry to follow up so quickly, but I just saw Allen relaxing with his head rested on his water bowl with part of his mouth hanging in it just getting wet. I have NEVER seen him do this! I’m so scared for him, but is this an emergency? I tend to overreact so…. I’ve attached a picture of this that I just took:


    • LBJ10
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      Wooly does this. The vet thinks it’s just more comfortable for him. He has chronic sinus issues and ear issues on one side (secondary to sinus issues). He isn’t truly tilted, however. Instead, he suffers from permanent facial paralysis on the one side.


    • bbbunzo
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      Yikes, I’m so sorry to hear about your Wooly! What other symptoms do the sinus issues cause? Maybe Allen’s ear infection caused something like that? Is Wooly’s paralysis a result of the sinuses or something else?

      Thanks so much for getting back to me and I apologize for the feverish questioning. I am just freaked out because Allen is 3 years old and this water bowl thing is out of the blue along with the leaning.


    • bbbunzo
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      I just wanted to add a picture I just got of Allen leaning/tilting. I really hope this doesn’t mean something bad.


    • Bam
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      It does sound likely that this has to do with the ear infection. Ear infections can affect the facial nerve (the nerve that controls facial muscles), because of the proximity of that nerve’s exit and the structures inside the ear. Sometimes an antiinflammarory (Metacam) can help because it reduces swelling.

      It should be investigated though, because if he has a bacterial infection, antifungal meds will have no effect. On the other hand, antibiotics often makes a fungal infection worse.

      I don’t think this is related to the Revolution. The side effects sometimes seen in cars and dogs are not like what you see in Allen. Revolution has been found to be Rabbit safe:http://www.k-state.edu/media/newsreleases/aug10/selamectin83010.html


    • bbbunzo
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      Thank you very, very much for the info. bam! You may be right – I will ask the vet about facial nerve damage and the anti-inflammatory. He is still his hoppy lil self and I haven’t seen him do anything weird so far today, but I’m watching.

      I just don’t understand why this would start happening all of a sudden, more than a week after we finished his ear drop regimen? Also, the vet said his yeast infection in the ear was “pretty bad” so I imagine he had it for a while (poor little guy!!!). Does it make sense that he would just now have these tilting symptoms after she had told me on Monday that the infection was cleared up?


    • Bam
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      It is very common for fungal infections to be stubborn. If a bacterial infection hasn’t been completely eradicated, you’d start seeing symptoms again after about a week off the antibiotics. It could be sth similar with a fungal infection. Sometimes there’s bacteria as well as fungus – in which case the bacteria have an open field once the fungus have been eradicated.

      I think you should ask your vet on Monday.


    • Wick
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      Going off of bam, if you are put on a regimen for either bacterial or fungal infection, and there is evidence that the infection is resilient (was able to come back after the first course of treatment), I recommend extending the course for a few days after symptoms have dissipated to ensure the entire infection has been eliminated. As bam mentioned, these infections can be quite stubborn, so even if only a few “bits” are left that are not showing symptoms of illness, that can sometimes be enough of a starting point for the infection to multiply and come back.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • LittlePuffyTail
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      First off, want to say how super cute your bunny is.

      Second, as bun Mom to a chronic ear infection for many years, I can repeat that ear infections can be very stubborn. Sometimes my Bindi would need 2 or even 3 courses of anitbiotics to eradicate an infection. For particularly stubborn ones, my vet would often add oral Baytril to fight it from the inside. I would discuss with your vet about doing a culture. My vet would always do cultures with the stubborn ones, because you really need to know what type of bacteria you are dealing with to find the best treatment.


    • LBJ10
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      Sorry, I couldn’t respond sooner. Your second picture – exactly how Wooly is sometimes. Resting the head on something and leaning/tilting while resting are both signs of ear discomfort of some kind.

      As for Wooly, he has tooth root problems. This causes sinus problems, which leads to ear problems. Nerve damage from ear infections can lead to permanent facial paralysis, which Wooly has. He is being monitored because he doesn’t always have an active infection going on. He simply has a lot of snot and ear gunk, which can harbor bacteria and lead to an infection. I can usually tell when that happens and the vet will put him on antibiotics. But this is a chronic problem, so the process repeats. I don’t think that is the case with your bunny. It may just be a stubborn yeast or bacterial infection. I was simply pointing out that I recognize the signs of when there is ear discomfort going on.


    • bbbunzo
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      LBJ10, bam, Wick and LittlePuffyTail – you guys are amazing, I really appreciate you responding and helping me so much! I feel awful and to blame for this and at least now I feel more educated and less scared and maybe like I can talk to the vet about this without sounding like a dumdum. Sorry it took so long to get back to you.

      bam: I’ll be sure to ask about the possibility of a bacterial infection. It didn’t occur to me he could have both simultaneously! Your timeline for symptoms seems pretty accurate so I bet you’re right about stubbornness.

      Wick: Extending the ear drop treatment next time will probably be a good idea, I will check with the vet. We just did 10 days of drops and by the end there was nothing left in the bottle (we did have a couple incidents where he managed to slip away before the drop got down in there, so I may have been a little wasteful). Maybe I could get a larger amount from her?

      LittlePuffyTail: Thank you soooo much! Allen loves compliments I’m sorry you’ve had to deal with this to an even greater extent – it’s very scary! I know they did a culture on him at the first visit and that is how she decided the infection was yeasty. They did not do one when we went back. The vet said that she looked and it was cleared up, but it sounds like maybe that’s not a good way to tell? Hopefully they will be receptive to doing another one.

      LBJ10: It’s no worries, I love you for getting back to me in the first place! It’s comforting to know that Wooly has done similar things that come from a similar problem. But I’m sorry your guy has had such issues, though it seems like you love him very much and take extra special care of him and I just hope that’s something I can provide for Allen. May I ask: what does facial paralysis look like? The pictures I’ve found just appear like it’s a sideways smirk on the bunnies’ faces. I just want to be able to keep an eye out. Also: have you noticed any kinds of side effects from consistent use of antibiotics? I’m sure you and your vet are very careful and I only ask because as a kid I was sick a lot and kept having to be put on them so I could be well enough for surgery and eventually they killed everything in me and I got colitis. Not fun, but a great learning experience!

      I’m trying to consider everything and you guys have given me such great information. I can’t tell you how helpful this is and I wanna hug y’all and your bunnies. One more question for everyone, if you don’t mind: based on what I’ve mentioned, do you feel like his vet is inadequate?

      The clinic has great reviews and was touted as the place to take bunnies (they even have one in the logo!), but we have only seen her twice and I’m not sure if it’s fair of me to expect her to have this all figured out right away. However, it’s already been well over $300 for two visits and I am poor at the moment and can’t really afford to blow a ton of cash on a Dr. that is not the most helpful one. I will spend every last penny and then beg for some more to make Allen better, but if he’s not in the best hands, it would be devastating. Sorry I have so much to say and thanks again!


    • Wick
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      Because rabbit-experienced vets are more uncommon and require special training (Wick’s vet still attends lectures, despite being out of school for decades, so she is constantly up to date on the newest findings), it is common that they are more expensive. Two visits totalling $300 is somewhat standard, especially if you were given medication/specialized exams at each.

      It may be helpful, if not done already, for you to ask for a break down of the bill expenses, that way you know what to expect when you have a similar visit. Wick’s vet gives us a copy of the bill, where everything that was done is checked off and the price for it written by the side, so I know exactly where my finances are going.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • bbbunzo
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      Oh yeah I definitely got the itemized bill. Thanks for letting me know, I’m glad you don’t think the price is ludicrous. Getting ripped off would be no fun. I guess since we’ve only had one other pretty inexpensive doctor visit at another place, I just don’t have much to base pricing off of. Only what I’ve read from other people on the internet who probably live in less expensive areas to begin with. The standard is just more costly for me at the moment I think and I’m afraid to spend it somewhere that’s not right for him (though I don’t really think that’s the case here so far).

      Little Update: I spoke with the vet this morning and have emailed them the pictures I showed you guys. They didn’t have any comments yet, but said they’ll have his Dr. look at the pics and she will call back to talk to me. That makes me feel good that they are caring.


    • Ellie from The Netherlands
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      I’m sorry that I can’t help you with health advice, I just hope that your cute little fluffball gets well soon!
      For humans it’s well-known that ear infections can induce dizziness, not sure how it is for buns.


    • bbbunzo
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      Wow Ellie thank you so much!!! You (or your bunny?) have my sister’s name, which is neat! We’re happy to get the well wishes and it’s so nice of you to be thinking of Mr. fluffball lol Your bun is precious too! I don’t think I’ve ever actually had an ear infection so I didn’t even realize what effect it has on us. I’m sure it’s even tougher for these furry little babies.


    • bbbunzo
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      I spoke with Allen’s vet and she was concerned about the frequency of his tilting so we are going in on Wednesday. She didn’t think it was too serious or an emergency based on the photos, so that’s good! I’ll let y’all know how it goes in a couple days. Thanks again for the help! I have a lot of good questions to ask the Dr. now.


    • LBJ10
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      Aww, thanks for saying that! I try. And yes, I love him very much. But there is only so much that can be done in his case, so his vet and I just do what we can for him.

      Yes, facial paralysis looks like a smirk or “nose wrinkle” on one side. It affects his lips and eyelid on that side. Fortunately, the nerves associated with chewing are not connected to those associated with the ears. So he has trouble picking things up with his mouth, but once he has it there isn’t a problem with actual chewing. I have been a bit worried lately because he obviously cannot eat as fast as Leopold and.. well, Leopold is a pig.


    • bbbunzo
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      I’m glad Wooly’s able to eat though. Allen is usually a piggy right when he gets fresh food then once he eats all the things he likes best out, he can be pretty slow. I get nervous sometimes that he’s not consuming enough hay so I’ve been trying to limit his veggies more. It is so sweet that Wooly has a friend to be with. I would love to find someone for Allen down the road. 


    • LBJ10
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      Also, forgot to answer… I have not noticed any ill effects from on and off antibiotics. Although we do switch it up (i.e. it’s not always Baytril). They don’t seem to affect his appetite either. They only make him hate me. LOL


    • bbbunzo
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      Hahaha yes they always get over it though. That’s good to hear about the antibiotics. Everything you guys have told me has really helped me be calmer about this.


    • Marissa
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      Hi there! I am experiencing something similar with my bunny Bubba at the moment. She was spayed on Friday and the evening we took her home she started leaning and would fall right over. I figured she was still under some anesthetic so I didn’t worry too much until the next evening. Took her to two different animal ER’s (the first one I went to couldn’t do much for bunnies) but the second prescribed her an oral antibiotic to be taken twice a day for one week. We started on Sunday and she is already so so much better! I know your vet will be able to help you and prescribe the best medication to make him better try not to worry yourself too much and keep us posted on how he’s doing!


    • bbbunzo
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      Thanks Marissa! I’m sorry you were having difficulties too. It’s hard to watch your little loved one in discomfort But I’m glad the antibiotics did their job and Bubba’s bouncing back! Allen’s anti-fungal seemed effective so it could be something else going on. We are seeing the vet tomorrow – hopefully it will all work out for the lil bunzo. Bubba is super adorable by the way! Thanks for the well wishes.


    • Marissa
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      Thank you and your Allen is so cute and seems so sweet too! I wouldn’t be surprised if mites were causing his tilt because when I brought Bubba in the vet gave me some mite stuff just in case even though she didn’t see any. Keep us posted how it goes today!!  


    • bbbunzo
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      Hello peeps!

      This is our update:

      We went to the vet today and she did an inspection and found that there was still some wax from Allen’s ear drops in his canal (AGAIN!!). They cleaned them the second time for free, at least.

      She said that may have been what was continuing to cause all his discomfort. I went in with a list of all the things he’s been doing that I found odd, and I probably came off a little craycray, but I think maybe it’s okay to be paranoid here. 

      The vet wants me to give him a few days to see if he feels better after the cleaning and if not, I will go back on Monday to pick up an anti-inflammatory. He has a calcium build up on the inside of his ear which she said can be caused by inflammation and it’s also possible that that is the source of his current problems. I hadn’t noticed it before and I feel really awful about that. I thought I paid close attention, but I don’t feel that way anymore.

      This has been a ton of money (for me) so far, but if Allen gets fixed up it will be more than worth it! Please let me know if any of this treatment or diagnosis or anything sounds off to you guys. I’m also interested to know if anyone has experience with inflammation or calcium buildups? I’m trying to be helpful to him but I am not the expert some of y’all are (and I’m so grateful for you!). I hope everyone else is well!

      Here is Allen back home, eating, with clean, VERY greasy ears:


    • LBJ10
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      Earwax can cause discomfort. But if it keeps coming back and plugging up his ear, then something isn’t right. So hopefully this will resolve the problem. The vet saw no sign of infection anymore?

      Where was this calcium deposit? I have only really heard of calcium deposits in the inner ear.


    • bbbunzo
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      Thanks for replying again! I don’t think it was a case of wax coming back (not regular wax he produces anyway) – from what I gathered, they just didn’t remove all the residual medicine in there the first time they cleaned his ears out and the second cleaning supposedly fixed that.

      This is the second time the vet checked his ears since the infection and said he is still okay as far as that (whew!). I was really concerned it had returned or another infection was going on simultaneously.

      The calcium deposit is on the inside of his ear, but not down in there. Maybe that’s the same as what you were saying. It’s on his left ear, about three inches down from the tip and an inch from the right side. It’s not discolored or anything, just a bump. She described it as kind of like cauliflower ear on people. When I touch it he doesn’t mind though, so at least it doesn’t bother him. I wonder if he even knows it’s there?

      On the plus side, the revolution seems to really be helping his ear bumps. They feel so much flatter! Also, I have not noticed him messing with his ears since we got home yesterday. I wasn’t able to spend that much time with him last night so I’ll pay closer attention today and over the weekend before we make a decision on the anti-inflammatory. But MAYBE this is the end of his problems. We would both be so relieved!


    • LittlePuffyTail
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      Never heard of calcium build-up in the ear before.

      But MAYBE this is the end of his problems. We would both be so relieved!

      I hope so!

      Allen is so cute!


    • bbbunzo
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      Thank uuuuuu! I hadn’t heard of it either and I guess the vet had mentioned it before, but I thought she was talking about the bumps at the tips of his ears. She said it was probably from inflammation while he had the yeast infection. I just wish I’d seen it sooner, but she said it doesn’t bother him and there’s no reason to try and treat it. I’m trying to research natural treatments for calcium buildups in people and I’m going to start with just massaging it every so often. I’ll let you guys know how things turn out next week. He is still looking good tho and seems a lot less irritated.

      Does anyone know of any other methods to help calcium buildups that I could use on a bunny?


    • Bam
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      I’m sorry I don’t know about how to remedy calcium buildup, but calcium buildup is common in buns because of how they metabolize calcium. They can even get calcium buildup inside their blood vessels, probably as an inflammatory response.

      Rabbits have an unusual way of metabolizing calcium -they absorb all calcium they eat. Other mammals don’t. In most mammals including humans, calcium uptake is tightly regulated by the presence of vitamin D. Without vitamin D, no calcium uptake. This is why lack of vitamin D in humans cause osteoporosis (brittle bone disease).

      If your vet hasn’t told you to cut back on calcium-rich food, I think they’re expecting the body to deal with the calcium buildup itself. I’ve never heard of calcium buildup in the ears. It’s very interesting.

      I hope he will get a lot better now his ears are clean, poor little sweetheart. Please keep us updated!


    • LBJ10
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      The only calcium deposits in the ear that I have ever heard of occur in the inner ear. You wouldn’t be able to see them on the outside. They would be inside the inner ear organs. When the calcium deposits flake off, they can actually lead to dizziness/vertigo. This happens in people.

      It sounds like this is some kind of deposit on the outer ear. What you’re describing though almost sounds like a papilloma. Can you post a picture? I’m curious what this thing looks like.


    • bbbunzo
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      This symptom must be pretty rare! Could it have been that he was getting too much calcium in his diet at some point? He only gets a little alfalfa these days but maybe it was too much when he was young or maybe there’s another food I’m not aware of?

      I don’t know what a papilloma would look like, but aren’t warts usually above the skin? His is totally underneath it. 

      This buildup or deposit or whatever I should call it is definitely outside the ear canal. I took a picture but the spot is very hard to see so I had to get real close with the flashlight on. The two little bumps are in the center of the photo just toward the bottom, one on top of the other.

       

      What do you guys think? Is he hideous now? 


    • Wick
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      Calcification is the formal term for calcium building up in the blood stream, creating solid objects. In rabbits however, it’s usually always in the urinary tract or the kidneys. The ears is very unusual. Did the vet take blood work or do an x ray to confirm they were calcium bumps versus something else, like cancer? Rabbits with excess calcium will have calcium crystals in their urine as well. Does your rabbit have current signs of cloudy or powdery urine right now?

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • bbbunzo
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      Yikes, no she did not do blood work or an x-ray. She looked at it and felt it and seemed pretty confident that it was a hard calcium buildup and not a need for concern or removal. She thought it was from previous inflammation that he likely doesn’t have anymore. If the last ear flush didn’t work I was going to give him anti-inflammatory meds to see if he still had inflammation that was causing ear troubles. I had pretty much decided he’s okay now and wasn’t going to get them, but maybe I should?

      I didn’t know cancer could even present itself that way. Are there other signs I could check for as well? His urine is normal – is there a certain color I should look out for? It has barely ever been cloudy since he stopped being a baby – I miss those days I’m not sure about powdery or what that means. Would that be like more viscous? What would calcium crystals look like? Like actual crystals you can see?

      Sorry to be such a noob on everything, I hope I can learn and grow as a bunny mom for him.


    • Wick
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      Cancer is extreme, the more common is what was mentioned above, which is warts/papillomas, which are fatty tumors. Usually benign though I believe. I’ve never had a rabbit with any of these cases, so I’m not sure what they look like visually or how they feel. If your vet felt confident after feeling them, it could be it feels distinctly different than the other options.

      Cancer in rabbits is most commonly uterine in unspayed females, but just like in humans, any abnormal growths of the skin should be examined, just in case it is cancer. It’s not common, but it’s always a possibility.

      If your vet is as rabbit experienced as he/she seems, I’m sure they considered these options.

      Powdery pee refers to when the pee dries, it leaves white powder behind (calcium crystals). It’s very apparent and hard to miss if it’s occurring.

      Since there are a lot of unknowns, I would talk to your vet and ask them more about the condition. What is their experience with it, what makes it feel different than a usual wart, and would reducing calcium intake help. It’s always good to ask your experienced vet about your concerns. When Wick’s vet recommends a treatment, I always ask about how it works, what I can expect, and what signs are they using to lead them to their treatment decision. This lets you learn more about general rabbit health, and it can give you more (or less) confidence in each of your vet’s decisions.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • bbbunzo
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      Ok, yes, she did say it was really hard so that factored into her diagnosis, i think. She does seem experienced and she also owns bunnies herself, which was very reassuring to me. Knowing she has other bunnies she loves makes me more confident she will treat mine as though she loves him as well. Couldn’t ask for much more, except maybe to clean his ears right the first time! lol

      I’ve seen the crystals you’re talking about before. At my old apartment before he totally got a hang of potty training, Allen’s favorite wrong place to pee was in front of our fridge (ewwwwww!). If I didn’t get to it before it dried it would leave the powder stuck to the tile and I had to use CLR to break it down before trying to clean it. NASTY stuff. I haven’t seen that in years though.

      I think I will call the vet next week and let them know I’m not coming for the anti-inflammatory for now, and ask if I can send them an email to give her with more questions. You give really good advice. I always get there and have so much to tell them and ask them that I get lost talking and don’t get through all the questions I wrote down. I usually get most of the details but my mind is very disorganized Would it be alright for me to show you guys a draft and get some feedback before I email her?


    • Wick
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      Of course. In terms of your own privacy, you should omit your name, address, and potentially even the name and address of your vet, if that information were to be included in your email. While BB forums is generally a safe place, general online precautions are still needed. If anything slips through the cracks when you copy and paste, a moderator will anonymize it for you if we see it.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • bbbunzo
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      Roger that! I’ll work on it this weekend. And thanks Wick! I think you are actually a lifesaver


    • LBJ10
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      I can see the bumps. Are they super hard or rubbery feeling? They do not look like papillomas, but if they are rubbery then they could be lipomas. They are more common in, um, “chunky” rabbits.


    • bbbunzo
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      Lol well Allen is certainly on the chunkier side of rabbits! Although given his frame, I don’t think there’s much choice  The bumps are super hard, not rubbery at all. He also doesn’t mind at all when I touch it or massage it, so that’s good I guess?


    • Bam
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      It’s very good that the bumps are not sore. There’s no visible signs of inflammation, that’s good too.

      Calcification can be due to long term inflammation. It’s not dangerous if it occurs where it doesn’t interfere with organ function or circulation etc. As Wick says it mostly occurs in the urinary tract (kidneys, bladder) and the major blood vessels in rabbits. In humans it can basically happen anywhere in the body. http://www.healthline.com/health/calcification#types


    • bbbunzo
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      Hey guys! Sorry for the delay, I had a crazy week. Allen is doing great, so I guess my letter to the vet fell as a priority a bit. Here are some things I hope to ask her this week:

      Is there a way to tell if Allen is still suffering from inflammation?

      It seems like the location of the calcium buildup on his ear is unusual. Does that indicate that the inflammation that caused it was only from his ear infection?

      Could any of the inflammation have been from dietary intake of calcium? Could some of that calcium be coming from things he eats outside?

      Is it possible for the inflammation to have caused calcium deposits internally? Would you be able to see them in an x-ray?

      Is it possible for the calcification to be cancerous? Would a biopsy be able to determine this?

      Could a blood test tell if his calcium levels are too high?

      I read that massage can help breakdown calcium deposits in humans. He doesn’t mind when I touch it – would it be a bad idea to try massaging the buildup?

      Let me know if y’all have any thoughts on what the answers might be or other questions I should add in there. Thank you!!! 


    • Ellie from The Netherlands
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      Great to hear about Allen

      Question 1: blood work can determime if there’s still an active infection.

      Last question: I wouldn’t massage it without consulting the vet. Crystals can have sharp edges which can damage tissue when pressed. This is why you never rub someone who has frostbite, and why gout hurts like mad.


    • Bam
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      A blood test can tell you if his blood calcium levels are too high. My Bam had that tested last summer, his blood calcium was too high and I was ordered to take out all high calcium vegs from his diet and only give him a small amount of pellets. We haven’t had a follow/up blood test, but he’s lost the overweight he had back then and he’s had a check-up by his rabbit savvy vet. He’s still off all high calcium greens.

      It’s not calcium that causes the inflammation. I’d say the inflammation was local, i e at the location where he has the calcium deposit now. Calcification is an inflammatory response, it’s one of the body’s many ways to defend itself. Inflammation is a response to some type of injury or the presence of sth that the immune system identifies as not belonging in the body. It’s the body’s way of trying to fix the problem. At times, this response is so heavy or goes on for so long that it makes matters worse instead of better. Calcification is not the first line of defense, it doesn’t occur until the inflammation has been going on for some time.

      Bigg-ish calcium deposits show up on x-rays, kidney stones for example.


    • bbbunzo
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      Thanks guys! I’m considering the blood test, but I will see if the Dr. thinks it might be a factor. Just out of concern I’ve been limiting Allen’s intake of high-calcium greens, which sucks because his FAVORITE is kale and I read that it has probably the highest calcium content! While doing that I’ve also decreased his overall intake of vegetables because I’m worried he wasn’t eating enough hay. He was not pleased but he’s getting used to the new diet. And he still gets fruit as treats which make him a happy lil camper. Do you know if there are any high-calcium fruits I should look out for?

      Ellie thank you so much for the advice on not massaging the deposit. I didn’t find that information when trying to read about them, only that it was a good idea for people, so I’m making sure to avoid touching it.

      Bam, I will look into whether getting an x-ray may be a good idea, but I don’t want to expose him to the radiation unless it’s necessary. At the same time I definitely don’t want to miss any other buildups there may be internally! I’m glad his calcium intake wasn’t responsible, but it makes me really sad that it was caused by a long term infection. I just wish I had known he was suffering so much sooner and there’s no telling when his infection started. I thought the mite bites on his ears were the only issue at first.

      Hopefully I will hear back early this week and I’ll let y’all know what she says.


    • Bam
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      Bug bites can give rise to calcification due to long term inflammation. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a painful process.

      I don’t know of any high calcium fruits.

      I don’t think you need to have him x -rayed for calcification.


    • bbbunzo
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      I see, it was probably the combo of mites and ear infection that lead to this. Poor little thing! Thanks for reassuring me he wasn’t suffering too much. The vet said it was probably just uncomfortable like when you get water in your ears. Still though! Good to know various fruit snack can go on as usual. Thanks again!


    • WaitForIt
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      Rye Neck is what makes your rabbits head tilt, it could be because of a tooth infection but a lot of times you cant fix those. Check with the vet.

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