Forum

OUR FORUM IS UP BUT WE ARE STILL IN THE MIDDLE OF UPDATING AND FIXING THINGS.  SOME THINGS WILL LOOK WEIRD AND/OR NOT BE CORRECT. YOUR PATIENCE IS APPRECIATED.  We are not fully ready to answer questions in a timely manner as we are not officially open, but we will do our best. 

You may have received a 2-factor authentication (2FA) email from us on 4/21/2020. That was from us, but was premature as the login was not working at that time. 

BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately! Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

What are we about?  Please read about our Forum Culture and check out the Rules

BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!  Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES 

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

BINKYBUNNY FORUMS

Forum BONDING “Help! Why are my rabbits fighting?!”

Viewing 0 reply threads
  • Author
    Messages

    • DanaNM
      Moderator
      6051 posts Send Private Message

      This is unfortunately a very common problem, and is very stressful for all humans and rabbits involved!

      The most common reason we see on this forum is that the rabbits were living together as babies, and one or both rabbits hit puberty.

      Baby rabbits do not truly bond (although this is a common misconception). We are not sure where this myth comes from, but new rabbit owners are often told that babies are easier to bond, so they get two babies. Once hormones come into the picture it very commonly causes fights to break out. In these cases, the rabbits should be separated completely (no time together at all, but they can be housed as neighbors), both should be spayed/neutered, and once hormones are settled (usually 2-6 weeks), they can be bonded. Do not despair though, you are not separating a bonded pair, as they were never truly bonded to begin with!

      This can also occur in pairs where one rabbit is already castrated and the other is not. Hormonal fluctuations can trigger fighting, which is why the general recommendation is for both rabbits to be castrated to ensure a stable and lasting bond.

      In a bonded adult pair where both buns are spayed/neutered, another common cause of fighting is that one bunny is sick, or went to the vet without the other bunny. Illness or a trip to the vet can cause one bun to smell differently and trigger some disputes. Bringing both buns to the vet together can help with this. If your vet won’t allow both bunnies to be there together (in the case that your bunny has to stay there for care for a while), just bringing the other bun with you when you pick up the bun from the vet, so they ride home together in the carrier, can be enough to re-cement the bond.

      There are other reasons for fighting in rabbits where both are adults and both are spayed/neutered. If the bond is new, the bonding process could have been too rushed. A change in the household (moving, new pet, new roommate) can also trigger some scuffles. In these cases, some bonding sessions in neutral space can usually repair the bond relatively quickly, as long as the fighting was not serious.

      If the squabbling between adult castrated buns is not serious (no injuries or hard biting), often you can supervise them in neutral territory and let them reestablish their dominance, as you did in the bonding process.

      However, if the fighting is bad (injuries, hard bites, locking on to each other), you should consider the bond broken. In this case, you will need to separate them, allow them to cool off for several weeks to allow the hurt feelings to repair, and then restart the bonding process.

      Give your bunnies some extra cuddles, take some deep breaths, and don’t panic! Most bonds can be repaired with some time and patience.

      . . . The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.  

Viewing 0 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Forum BONDING “Help! Why are my rabbits fighting?!”