Forum

OUR FORUM IS UP BUT WE ARE STILL IN THE MIDDLE OF UPDATING AND FIXING THINGS.  SOME THINGS WILL LOOK WEIRD AND/OR NOT BE CORRECT. YOUR PATIENCE IS APPRECIATED.  We are not fully ready to answer questions in a timely manner as we are not officially open, but we will do our best. 

You may have received a 2-factor authentication (2FA) email from us on 4/21/2020. That was from us, but was premature as the login was not working at that time. 

BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately! Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

What are we about?  Please read about our Forum Culture and check out the Rules

BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!  Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES 

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

BINKYBUNNY FORUMS

Forum BEHAVIOR Falling over when grooming

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • Author
    Messages

    • kanin
      Participant
      136 posts Send Private Message

      Is Fresno falling over while he grooms himself something to be worried about? He’s completely fine otherwise, no change in attitude or appetite and he doesn’t seem off-balance any other time. But a lot of the times when he grooms himself, if he’s not leaning against something he’ll fall over onto his side, like when he’s stretching around to reach his back. I’m wondering if it’s maybe just because he’s a chunk??


    • Bam
      Moderator
      15216 posts Send Private Message

      I dont know, I had a bun who fell over when he had fur mites (I had just found him abandoned in the woods). The fur mites were between his shoulderblades, where he obviously couldn”t reach, but he really tried to. (I of course got him treatment and the mites never returned).

      That same bun later fell over backwards in anticipation of a treat, esp when the treat was a slice of peach

      He was perfectly healthy then, but he was crazy food oriented.

      I think you should study him in order to find out if he exhibits a balance problem in other situations as well. As you know, an inner/middle ear infection can cause balance issues, as can e cuniculi.


    • LittleLionMan
      Participant
      110 posts Send Private Message

      Bam raises some important points and things to look out for. As the fellow owner of a chonky boy, I will also add that sometimes my boy teeters when he grooms. I’m not sure he’s ever fallen completely on his side or back, but I have seen him get off balance before. It mostly happens if he’s trying to get hard to reach places, so it doesn’t occur every day. Sometimes I’ll put my hand behind him when he’s leaning back so he has something to push against if he needs. But as Bam said, you should watch your bun and figure out when it’s happening and how often. maybe that may help you deduce why it may be happening and if a vet visit is warranted.


    • kanin
      Participant
      136 posts Send Private Message

      Ugh. So he doesn’t exhibit a general balance problem, only when grooming and reaching behind him like towards his back/above his butt. But after posting this and observing him more I’ve noticed he grooms himself a lot more often than my other two. I did treat them all for ear mites but maybe it didn’t get rid of them. Which is really irritating because my vet for some reason refuses to let me buy revolution from them and instead insists that I use oral ivermectin which clearly isn’t working. I don’t even understand why the mites are so persistent. We keep a clean house and their area is clean and they never go outside.


    • Bam
      Moderator
      15216 posts Send Private Message

      Rabbits as a rule get mites from their mothers. The rabbit’s immune system keeps the number of mites down, so they cant cause any trouble. Then if the bun experiences stress of some kind (it doesnt even have to be negative stress), the immune defense takes a (temporary) toll, and the mites seize the opportunity to multiply.

      So is not about the hygiene in your house. Its still wise, of course, to do thorough cleaning, wash fabrics and freeze toys etc for 48-72 hours, after the bun receives treatment. The bun should get repeat treatment after 8-14 days in order to catch the mites that were eggs when you did the first round. For heavy infestations, the bun might need a 3rd round of treatment.

      If you look at the skin under the fur where he scratches, do you detect any sort of problem? Fur mites typically cause skin-colored (yellowish-white) scabs/crusts and flakiness. The skin of a rabbit should be completely even in texture, soft and pliable  (except on the face where you can feel small hard-ish “knobs” that  typically encompass a whisker.)


    • kanin
      Participant
      136 posts Send Private Message

      That’s so strange and interesting! But yes I did 3 rounds of treatment. He even got treatment soon after I first brought him home. So they seem to just be coming back. At their vet visit when they got their ears cleaned she ran her hands through their fur to check their skin and didn’t see anything, but I’ll check it myself in a bit and let you know if I do.


    • Cinnamon Bun
      Participant
      139 posts Send Private Message

      @Kanin, how is he now? Have you spotted anything yet? ♥

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Forum BEHAVIOR Falling over when grooming