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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Bunny won’t eat pellets

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    • Cocoa
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      My two bunnies have an appointment to be spayed tomorrow morning. Cocoa hasn’t eaten her pellets. She did eat some hay and her veggies. She is being her normal self other than not eating pellets. Her pooping is normal. Should I cancel the spay?


    • Cocoa
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      Please answer asap. It’s almost time to leave for the vets office for their spays


    • Muchelle
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      If they ate in general and are pooping/peeing fine, they should be fine. You can make it known to the vet if they have significantly eaten less than usual and decide together what to do.


    • Cocoa
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      Cocoa ate almost all her hay and a little bit of pellets. Lily ate her usual amount. The vet is an hour away so we wont go there except for the spays. We have a closer vet but they are expensive for spays. Should I do it?


    • Muchelle
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      They won’t be eating anyways during the car trip, so distance is relatively important. If they will have to wait at the vet’s office before the procedure, then they should be offered something to eat.

      If you are not personally convinced about the vet you have booked with (the one that suggested not to feed them before the spay, If I’m not remembering incorrectly) and would like them seen by another vet, it’s completely in your rights to do. You can also go to the vet, discuss with them the procedure etc and decide not to go through with it.

      Just a piece of friendly advice here: don’t wait on forum responses. It can be replies come too late, as it’s happening now. In this case it’s nothing incredibly urgent, but if for example a bun is sick, never wait on us to respond


    • Cocoa
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      Do you think I should have them spayed even though Cocoa won’t eat her pellets? I normally feed her before i leave in the evening and then I’m back around four the next day. I don’t know if normally she would be still eating


    • Muchelle
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      As long as her stomach isn’t empty, it’s fine


    • Cocoa
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      So you think yes? Even though she hasn’t eaten pellets she will be fine because she had hay?


    • Muchelle
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      I can’t know because I am not there. If she has eaten her other foods and just left pellets, then her stomach is not empty which is okay.


    • Cocoa
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      Okay thank you so much. Sorry I am just nervous because they are my first bunnies. We are on our way to the vet


    • Muchelle
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      I know, don’t worry good luck


    • Cocoa
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      Just got home. We are picking them up around 4:30


    • Sirius&Luna
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      I hope it all goes well!

      I would spend this time thoroughly cleaning out their hutches, and setting up clean hutches with nice soft blanketted areas, and making sure you have a range of tempting foods for them. I would also recommend giving small portions often, so you can see if/how much they’re eating. Will you be keeping them indoors for the first couple of nights? I think it would be best.

      Don’t be afraid if they seem sleepy when you pick them up, that’s a pretty quick turn around for a spay, so I wouldn’t be surprised if they were still sleepy. And make sure the vets send you back with painkillers for them.


    • Cocoa
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      I am about to clean the hutch. I will talk to the vet about them staying inside when we pick them up. What are the best foods to offer? I will make sure to get pain killers. If I use fleece will it get ruined?


    • sarahthegemini
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      They really should be kept inside whilst they recover, at least.

      What do you mean would the fleece get ruined?


    • Sirius&Luna
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      Best food is anything they usually enjoy Often they go back to pellets last, but fresh veg is a good way of getting water into them. So any vegetables you normally give them, maybe have some fruit too in case they won’t eat veg, but I wouldn’t offer it to them unless they’re not eating anything else. Offer them their usual pellets and hay too.

      They might pee on or chew the fleece, but it is important that they have something soft to lie on. An old towel could also work, but make sure they’re not eating bits of it (unlikely, after a spay, but still important to keep an eye on).


    • Cocoa
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      I used some soft towels. I just didn’t want them to pee on the fleece so I was going to use towels instead. They are both doing good. Cocoa is starting to act more like herself. She is pushing the cage door when I try to close it so I know she’s feeling a little better. Thank you


    • Cocoa
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      We picked them up an our ago. They haven’t eaten anything. I offered them lettuce, oranges, orange peel, and carrots. Those are the only veggies and fruits i had. My mom is going to the store tonight and she will be buying more. Lily is still really groggy. Normally she gets up and goes to the back of the cage when I open the door. Right now she is just laying down and ignoring me. Cocoa is acting totally normal. She always gets really excited for food but today she didn’t care. She knows it’s there. The vet didn’t give us pain meds. Just said they gave them a painkiller shot and that rabbits don’t normally need pain meds. What should I do?


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Can you contact the closer vet that was more expensive and ask if you can get a prescription for pain meds?


    • Cocoa
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      So rabbits are supposed to be eating this soon after a spay? I will but my mom doesn’t think rabbits normally eat this soon after surgery. The vet and breeder both said that rabbits don’t need pain meds and she’s listening to them instead of me and the ten websites i found saying they do. Any particular websites I could show her that they need pain meds and should eat this soon after?


    • Sirius&Luna
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      H&T has a good idea – it’s definitely worth contacting the other vet and they’ll prescribe you pain medications.

      Link from the HRS about post spay recovery, including pain meds:
      https://rabbit.org/post-surgical-aftercare/

      Perhaps you could explain to your parents that rabbits can hide their pain very well, but pain is often shown in a lack of appetite. If they don’t eat then they’ll end up requiring more vet care, which will get more expensive for your parents. Spending a small amount of money on pain medications is a. Much better for the rabbit which has had major surgery and b. Much cheaper in the long run.

      I don’t know how soon after they should eat, as my vet kept Luna for 36 hours after her spay to ensure she was eating and pooping properly. I would say it’s essential that they eat in the first 12 hours after the spay. If they haven’t eaten by that point, you need to contact the vet and demand some pain medication, and critical care. You might need to force feed them.

      It’s great that Cocoa’s doing well.

      Are they inside and warm? Rabbits that are coming round from anaesthetic and not eating can lose body heat very quickly.

      You can also try soaking pellets in some warm water, and trying to feed them that.


    • Cocoa
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      My parents won’t let them stay inside. I gave them lots of soft blankets. There is no way I can get my mom to drive me back to the vet. It’s an hour there and an hour back. I would have to spend extra money at a closer vet for pain meds. Syringe feeding pellets?


    • Muchelle
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      They need to be eating as soon as possible. Anesthesia slows their guts and, since they are so prone to GI stasis, it’s important that they keep filling their stomachs and guts to keep things moving along. They also need a good pain management (they should be on pain meds and antibiotics after a surgery) because pain is also a cause for GI stasis, other than the obvious fact that it is a negative feeling in general.

      Well, do invite your mom to chat with us We’ll be glad to answer her questions. We’re all bun owners and some here have been for many years.

      Also, in case you are, please don’t give them orange freely. Orange is very sugary (it’s to be considered a treat) and acidic (may damage the mouth or stomach if given too often too much). The seeds aren’t good for a bun to eat, so remember to take them out

       Personally, I also remove the white-ish peel around each slice of orange because I’ve read it may cause troubles if ingested.

      [Edited for… botched grammar problems]


    • Wick
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      http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/opcare.html

      ^ from Dana Krempels, Ph.D.

      “Pain Management
      Any surgery, including a neuter or (especially) a spay, will make bunny sore for one to several days.
      • Pain management in rabbits is critical to uneventful recovery.
      • Most experienced vets routinely administer analgesics such as metacam/meloxicam, Banamine (flunixin meglumine), buprenorphine, tramadol, etc. before or shortly after surgery, so the bunny will be as comfortable as possible while waking up.
      • Ask the veterinarian about this before scheduling surgery. If no pain medications are going to be given to your rabbit, you should probably seek a different vet!
      • Before bringing your bunny home, ask your vet about follow-up pain management at home, when the initial dose wears off. ”

      General Pet MD site: https://www.petcoach.co/article/spaying-and-neutering/

      “Rabbits in pain become stressed and will not eat, which can result in serious complications. The use of analgesics (pain relievers) in rabbits is important to reduce the recovery time.”

      From House Rabbit Society, includes clause about pain management after procedures: https://rabbit.org/the-importance-of-analgesia-pain-control-for-pet-rabbits/

      “Drugs (oral, injectable or transdermal)
      Opioids – these drugs are related to morphine and there are several safe and effective candidates in this category. They are most often used for bone pain and as part of a pre and post surgical pain management protocol. These drugs are most often given by injection, but some can be given orally or as a transdermal patch on the skin.”

      — I have a male, so no experience with post-spay recovery, but considering that even a male neutering, which is a much more simple and less invasive procedure, requires pain meds afterwards, pain meds after a spay only seems logical. You can explain to your mother what a spay is, maybe that will help. I warn you the images on this site are graphic, as they show the operation, so if you do not want to look, do not, but maybe show them to your mother so she can see how this is no small operation: http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Uro_gen_diseases/castration/Spay/Steril_en.html . The end does mention post-op care, which includes the heavy recommendation for pain medications

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      I will call her right now to explain it. I gave each bunny some mash to try to get them to eat. Is applesauce something I can mix with their mash to make it more appetizing?


    • Bam
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      The most important thing is to get the bun to eat post spay, and to keep the bun warm. Those two things go together, a bun that’s cold wont eat and a bun that doesn’t eat gets cold.

      Your mother is of course very welcome to come here =)


    • Cocoa
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      She doesn’t trust the opinions on here because you can’t actually see the person. She finally agreed to buy pain meds but I have to wait until tonight. Where do I buy the pain meds?


    • Bam
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      You need a prescription for pain meds. A vet must write the prescription or call it in/email it to the pharmacy you want to use.
      Metacam is the preferred drug after a spay. It has fewer tummy side effects than buprenorphine (another painkiller). It also tastes good to rabbits so it’s easy to get them to take it.

      You can absolutely use apple sauce to make the buns take their food more willingly. There’s sugar in fruit, but that can be a good thing when a. bun has just had surgery and is feeling out of it.

      Your mother wouldn’t have to take our words for the importance of pain management in bunnies. We could provide her with links from trusted sources. I’ll alert the site’s owner (Jen) to your thread, I’m sure she’d be happy to reply to any questions your mum might have.


    • Cocoa
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      I will send her every link that is posted. Cocoa was fighting me when I first attempted to syringe feeding her. Once I finally got a drop of it into her mouth, she realized she liked it and cooperated. Do we have to take them to the vet or can the vet that spayed them just write a prescription? I will add some applesauce.


    • Muchelle
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      The vet needs to know how much they weight to prescribe Metacam, so theoretically he doesn’t need to see them in person.
      As for where to get it (if things work like they do over here) you should be able to purchase it directly from the vet or in a pharmacy that also stocks on veterinary drugs. Metacam is a medicine widely used for cats and dogs too, so it should be easy to find.


    • Cocoa
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      Can I get the meds from a vet near me without bring them in. Cocoa is now happily eating the mash when I syringe feed her. She won’t eat anything on her own though


    • Muchelle
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      Do try to call them and explain the situation, maybe they will be able to help you.


    • Bam
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      I think they can prescribe the meds without seeing them if you explain the situation. It’s worth a try, if they say no, they say no.

      It’s great that Cocoa is eating her mash!!! It’s normal to not want to eat on her own just yet, what’s important is that she eats. Good job!


    • Cocoa
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      I put her back in her cage with a bowl of mash and she started eating. Lily won’t eat even with a syringe. Every time I try she yanks her head away and I’m worried I’ll do more harm than good with that. What should I do?


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Any updates on Lily? And were you able to get a pain med prescription for them yet?


    • sarahthegemini
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      It’s really important that Lily eats. Force feeding isn’t nice but it’s for her own good. Are you able to have a person help you? When I had to force feed Buttercup (stasis), I had my boyfriend hold her in a blanket firmly (bunny burrito style) The blanket was wrapped around her with just her little head poking out. She did try to move her head a bit but wasn’t really able too because of how we’d wrapped her. Then I force fed the recovery mix very slowly. Use your fingers to part her lips a little and put the syringe in at the side where there’s a gap. Make sure you push the syringe depressor very slowly and stop so that she can swallow.


    • Cocoa
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      The vet said he gave her a shot of pain meds that lasts 24 hours. It will wear off around lunchtime today. He said he doesn’t like to give pain meds because it messes with their digestive system. He said it’s fine that she doesn’t want to eat and she probably won’t until the shot wears off. He said she would be fine. Won’t not eating cause stasis? I don’t have anyone who can help me. My mom just says that if she doesn’t eat for 24 hours it’s fine because that’s what the vet said. I am not home right now but I will be in an hour. When I get there I will update on Lily. I am really worried about her because she loved the mashed banana with a syringe a few days ago. She was so easy to feed and Cocoa was the difficult one. Now Lily won’t eat. I’m just glad Cocoa is eating. Is it possible their teeth are hurting since the vet trimmed their teeth? Neither of them will eat anything solid. Cocoa wouldn’t eat on her own until I gave her mash that had so much water it was liquid. She wouldn’t eat it softened at all, only liquid. Neither of them would eat their hay or veggies. What should I be watching for with Lily?


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Unfortunately I only have bad news for you. I think at this point you need to do everything you can to get food in Lily’s stomach regardless of how much she fights back. If she is past the 12 hour mark with no food then I think she is close to GI stasis if she isn’t already. At that point you NEED to get her to a vet. I really hope she pulls through.


    • Deleted User
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      I can tell you from experience it is so important for them to be eating after the spay, and getting pain meds. If they aren’t eating, they are likely in pain and need to be given meds. Not eating for more than 24 hours can lead to stasis, which can be deadly. Both of my boys were eating on their own within 24 hours. Bombur stopped eating at one point because he was in pain and was developing an infection.

      Change Lily’s litter box so there’s only fresh bedding, and monitor for poops. If she isn’t pooping, she needs to see a vet ASAP. If she’s refusing a treat, that is not a good sign. A bun that is doing well will not reject a treat, such as a banana. I really do think they need to be on those pain meds, as spays are painful procedures and they will not want to eat until they are not in pain any longer.


    • Cocoa
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      I know. It’s my mom, shes listening to the vet. Is it safe to give her pain meds when she already had the shot that lasts 24 hours. If I get there and Lily hasn’t eaten, we are going to the closer vet. Cocoa is rejecting treats and anything not liquid, but she is eating liquid mash on her own. As soon as I get home I will syringe feed her and if she hasn’t eaten anything, we will go to the vet


    • Cocoa
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      Lily ate some lettuce when i fed her!


    • Sirius&Luna
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      I think you need to go to the closer vet, not the vet who did the ops, as he’s giving you bad advice. I would tell the other vet everything that has happened so far.

      I know this must be hard for you, because the vet is telling you one thing, your mum is telling you one thing, and we’re all telling you another. It must be stressful. However, rabbits are classified as ‘exotic’ pets for a reason, and many vets simply don’t know how to treat them. Wick linked you to some reputable sites that back up what we’re saying though. Lots of us have had our bunnies spayed, and we’re talking with experience and the bunnies best interests at heart.

      If she is given oral metacam, that won’t mess with her digestion, and it should be fine with the 24 hour shot too, but again, I would give the new vet the details of everything the previous vet did, including dosage of pain meds. If they gave you a printed reciept it should have that information on it.

      It’s also very worrying that your vet decided to do a painful tooth trim during the spay, which might be another reason that they’re not eating (I saw this in your other thread, correct me if I’m wrong. Again, this is another reason that they need painkillers.

      I’m glad that Cocoa is eating. She is probably eating enough to be ok, its a good sign that shes eating the mash on her own. Is she pooping?

      It’s obvious that you’re worried and doing the best you can in challenging circumstances. Stay calm!


    • Cocoa
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      She is eating from the syringe!


    • Sirius&Luna
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      That’s good news! Any poops?


    • Cocoa
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      Yes. She is pooping and peeing. I wanted to go to the vet to get pain meds and my mom won’t let me even though I would pay for it. She won’t eat anything hard so I think her teeth do hurt from the teeth trim. She wont eat carrots, oranges, and pellets.


    • Cocoa
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      She won’t eat strawberries either


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Just out of curiosity but did you request for Lily’s teeth to be trimmed or did the Vet do than on his own?


    • Cocoa
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      On his own. My mom won’t listen to me that they shouldn’t have done that. They said they did that so they wouldn’t chew on their stitches


    • Wick
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      Ideally, the tooth trim shouldn’t have made her teeth hurt too too much, but it’s great that you’re staying on top of this and being very persistent with you rabbit care, though as stated above, you’re getting a lot of mixed signals. It’s great that she’s eating and pooping.

      In terms of the more hard foods, have you tried cutting them into small strips she can more easily pull and navigate in her mouth? Wick can’t eat large food chunks due to his teeth, so his lettuce and treats are all small.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Deleted User
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      that is so so wrong! you do not trim down the teeth to stop them from pulling stitches. If they’re going to pull on their stitches they will do that anyways! The only reason they should ever have their teeth trimmed, is if they are too long from not eating enough hay, or if they have some type of dental issue like a malocclusion.


    • Sirius&Luna
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      That is honestly the most unbelievably terrible excuse. I’m worried about what they’ve done to the poor bunnies’ teeth. Is it the front teeth they’ve trimmed?

      I would look up and see if there’s anywhere you can report this vet too. The way they have behaved is completely unacceptable. You can’t just file a rabbits teeth so it won’t chew its stitches…. Most vets use glue to prevent chewing, or failing that, a little vest or cone.


    • Harley&Thumper
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      It won’t really help you but I would try and write a Google review for the vet stating the problems you had with the vet. That way people in the future will know not to take their rabbits to that vet.


    • Cocoa
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      My mom doesn’t understand they shouldn’t have done these things. I am doing everything I can to get them to eat. I cut the treats up into strips and tiny pieces. Lily will only eat the mash from the syringe and lettuce. When you said the most unbelievably terrible excuse, did you mean me or the vet? Cocoa doesn’t seem to be bothered by the teeth trim. She is yanking the towel around and acting normal but she wont eat hard foods still.


    • Cocoa
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      Like on yelp?


    • Deleted User
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      The vet for sure. Eating is very different from just grabbing something in their teeth. She could still be in pain while eating, especially if the teeth were trimmed too low. Were they the front teeth or the back teeth that were trimmed? I’m assuming the front teeth.

      Just out of curiosity, why doesn’t your mother look up proper bunny care? I understand you are doing everything you can, but as you are still a minor, it is her responsibility to be caring for them in the proper fashion.


    • Cocoa
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      I don’t know what teeth they trimmed. I will look later. I am feeding her so I want to give her a break first


    • Harley&Thumper
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      The vet is in the wrong not you. I think you have done the best you can given the situation. Usually if you enter a place in google you can see reviews of the place. I am trying to get in touch with a friend of mine who is a vet. He might know who to report the vet to.


    • Harley&Thumper
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    • Sirius&Luna
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      Sorry Cocoa, I meant the vet not you. You are clearly doing everything you can I’m glad they’re starting to eat. I’m just horrified that a vet can treat people and pets like that, after you trust them with your pet.


    • Cocoa
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      My mom just trusts the breeder and vet. Let me know if you figure out who to report it to. In the meantime I will put a review on yelp.


    • Harley&Thumper
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      The group is dependent on where you are. Would it be against the forum rules to post the location of the vet?


    • Cocoa
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      I will talk to my mom about filing a complaint. I don’t know if it’s against forum rules


    • Cocoa
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      Lily’s poos are really clumped together and Cocoa’s are very mushy. Is this normal?


    • Wick
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      It may be helpful to show your mother HRS’ helpful guidelines for finding a good rabbit vet. Some helpful quotes include (http://rabbit.org/faq-how-to-find-a-good-rabbit-vet/):

      ” …your rabbit’s well being depends upon finding the most experienced veterinary care available. We hope that within another few years, veterinarian schools will begin to understand rabbits well enough so that veterinarians can be properly trained before they run across a rabbit in their practice. The other problem is that veterinarians not trained in rabbit medicine should be responsible enough to refer you to another veterinarian. Instead many just see the green of your money and say to themselves, ‘sure I’m a vet, I can see your pet, after all it’s only a rabbit.’”

      “Don’t assume that just because a veterinarian works with breeders or local 4-H clubs, that they are experienced with house rabbits or the medical needs of older rabbits. Unfortunately, such veterinarians often tend to approach rabbits as stock animals rather than as beloved companions. They may never have done a spay or neuter and “treatment” of any difficulty may amount to euthanasia (when dealing with stock or show animals, the financial bottom line may be the primary consideration).”

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      They treated them more like stock animals than a pet. My mom thinks they are fine. Cocoa doesn’t want to eat. Should I try to force feed her with the syringe


    • Cocoa
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      Does this look normal? This is Lily.


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Can you find another way to post the photo? I can’t view it.


    • Wick
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      Because the picture is through your Gmail, we cannot see the image Cocoa. Can you save it on paint and upload it?

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      Sorry I don’t know how to do that.


    • Cocoa
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      IMG_5896.JPG


    • Cocoa
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      I can’t get it to work


    • Harley&Thumper
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      Hit Reply instead of the entering your response in the quick reply section

      Then click the down (&darr arrow on attachments

      Then press choose file and find the picture you want to upload

      Then press upload

      Then press insert image to add the image


    • Harley&Thumper
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      I guess Alt-Codes don’t work on this forum


    • Wick
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      STEP ONE: Take a screen-shot with the image you want on your screen. On your keyboard, there should be a key that says “Print Screen” or “PrntScrn”. Press that and it will take a copy of what’s on screen. Nothing may blip to say you did it, but you’ll know if it worked if Step Two goes smoothly.

      STEP TWO: Press “Ctrl + V” or “Paste” to plop the screen shot into paint. Then, use the Select and Crop tool to get just the image.

      STEP THREE: After cropping the image, use the “Resize” option (next to select, under Crop) to make the image smaller. I usually just replace the 100’s with 50’s (as shown above).

      If when you go to upload on BB it says it’s too big “maximum file size allowed is 500kb”, open the image in paint again and reduce the size again.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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    • Cocoa
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      Did this work?


    • Cocoa
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      Also, should I limit the lettuce? Today that is the only thing either of them will eat on their own


    • Deleted User
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      I can see the photo. The site looks fine to me. It doesn’t look like their any leakage or pus. I have two boys, so I know what an infected neuter looks like, not really a spay site. If there’s any foul odor, then you might want to get them checked for infection. I wouldn’t limit lettuce if it’s the only thing they’re eating, the important thing is to keep them eating anything. Give them a handful of lettuce every 3-4 hours to make sure they are eating. When Bombur’s neuter was infected, the only thing he would eat was parsley. Along with Critical Care, I gave him a few sprigs of parsley every few hours.


    • Wick
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      The image works, yay! Unfortunately, Wick is a male so I only know about neuters… quite uninformed about how a female is supposed to look, but on an uneducated positive note, it doesn’t look infected (puss or leaking discharge) or irritated (swollen) from what I can tell. There looks to be some dried blood near the bottom, but Wick came home with dried blood that he eventually groomed off himself.

      Hopefully female pet rabbit owners can chime in soon with their feedback!

      …. What fluffy white fur

      In regards to eating, whatever they’ll eat, I think you should offer so they don’t become malnourished. They need food so they have the strength to recover! In addition to offering what you know they’ll take, continue to attempt to offer hay and pellets so when they’re ready to eat them, they can. For the hay, maybe keep presented fresh hay, rather than presenting the same stack. Fresh hay tends to be more potent in scent (the hay from the bag, not sitting out already), and sometimes that’s more appetizing. If you find they will eat bits of hay, definitely keep encouraging that by cycling hay so they can comb through and find through and find the pieces they’re willing to eat!

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      I am having a really hard time getting her Cocoa to eat from a syringe. I was only able to get her to eat a mashed banana with a little mash mixed in through a syringe. I have changed hay a few times, Cocoa ate about three strands. Should I buy some critical care?


    • Cocoa
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      Since the mash is mostly water how much should I feed them?


    • Deleted User
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      I would, just because it has the nutrients they need, if they won’t eat anything else. Another thing you can do, which worked wonders for Bombur, is to mix the banana and pellet mash together and leave it in the cage. Bombur surprised me and ate it overnight. If you leave it, eventually she could be enticed to eat some on her own.


    • Wick
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      Critical care would be a good idea because it has a good nutritional balance, and it’s meant for rabbits who are recovering from something who cannot eat normally due to post-op conditions.

      You can purchase it on Amazon, with Prime for pretty cheap so you and your mom don’t have to travel anywhere. It would be good to have on hand for the future regardless of whether you use it now or later. http://www.amazon.com/Oxbow-Critical-Apple-Banana-Supplement/dp/B001FKACXO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520363070&sr=8-2&keywords=critical+care+rabbits

      If you can try to get the mash to be less water, that’d be good. I know it can be tough to get through a syringe, but maybe they may lick it off your finger or a spoon.

      I forget if you’ve tried this already, but a mash made from their pellets (soak in water, mash) may be more nutritious than just a banana mash. Maybe throw in some soaked pellets to add some more nutrition.

      Even though it’s a lot of water, at most, they’ll probably just pee a lot. It’s mainly important that they’re getting calories in their body. I’d say set aside at least 3 times per day to sit down and just feed them as much as they’re willing to take. Once they’re full, they won’t let you feed it to them anymore.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Bam
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      The incision looks good, as A & B says. Thank you Wick for the helpful screenshot instruction!

      You can feed the pellets mash in small portions 3-5 times a day. It’s great that she ate a few strands of hay, that’s actually really great.

      Sometimes you need to customize a feeding syringe and make the hole bigger with a knife. I like using small syringes (1 ml) but I always saw the tip off the syringe with a bread knife or the pellet mash/Critical Care won’t go through. And do put a small plate with some mash + banana on it, some buns are reluctant at first but if they venture to have a taste they can often not resist to gobble up the whole thing. What she eats now is less important than that she eats something.


    • Cocoa
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      I have tried regular mash and mixing in banana. Cocoa wont eat it. We are going to the vet this afternoon if they haven’t eaten. I am going to buy the critical care. I was barely even able to get Cocoa to eat just mashed banana. Lily is actually starting to use her litterbox I will continue feeding them whatever they will eat until this afternoon because then they will either be eating on their own or we are going to a vet. Not the same vet who did the surgery though


    • Deleted User
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      That’s why it still might be a good idea to leave the mash in her cage rather than force feeding. eventually she might be enticed by the smell or even be hungry enough to try to eat it on her own. But definitely do pellets mixed with banana and water, so she gets all her nutrients. I’m glad you’re going to take them to the vet though. Especially in this case, a second opinion will be good. Make sure to ask for Metacam.
      Where in Texas are you located? Member Rain also lives in Texas, and she has seen a decent vet I believe. Maybe she’ll be able to help with finding a good vet.


    • Cocoa
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      I found a different vet and I made sure they are extremely experienced with rabbits and know what they are talking about. I left the food in their cage last night and they didn’t eat. I cleaned out their bowls and gave them some fresh mash and they haven’t touched it. I was able to look at the receipt and the vet gave them each a shot of metacam that lasts 24 hours so it wore off an hour ago


    • Deleted User
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      It’s good you found a better vet. The syringe version of metacam works wonderfully, especially in those first few days. The vet should also have Critical Care available to give you as well. At least mine does, so it’s worth asking.  Fingers crossed the vet can help them!


    • Wick
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      Yes yes, the vet may have critical care they can sell to you so you can have it more quickly. If you only have one small syringe, you can also try asking for a larger syringe/syringes so it’s easier for you to feed mash/critical care. If given the option, typically rabbits like the apple&banana (green and silver) critical care over the original flavor.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      I will ask for the critical care. Thank you! I will let you know what happens


    • BinkyBunny
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      I am just seeing all of this now, and… and wow…Cocoa, I am impressed. You really are doing so well under all the pressure and being pulled in different directions. I understand why your mom would trust the vet and breeder before us. When you can talk and see people face to face, it does build a level of trust, where the net can be filled with so much misinformation. So it’s understandable that she is skeptical as she also wants the best outcome too – She wouldn’t want to see you hurt if things didn’t turn out right, and so I am sure she is doing what she feels is best. And you are too, and your perseverance to continue to weed through all the information, from breeder, vet, mom, net articles, this forum, etc etc, seek out a vet that you trust to help insure the best recovery is outstanding. Your mom sure did an amazing job with you – Even if you may not see eye to eye right now.

      Spays are more invasive than neuters, and so it does take time for your females to heal. They may feel lousy for a few days. You may be feeding them by hand for a few days (even with pain meds if you can get them from the new vet). Hydration is very important to keep the gut going too. Hand feeding greens can be helpful. Also, breaking off the greens, like cilantro, mint, parsley etc can release their strong scent and entice them to eat. Also, if/when you end up feeding the critical care, not making it too thick will helpful — One vet tech told me to make it the texture of Tomato soup.

      So when you said you found a new vet — have you seen that one yet, or you just found and are getting an appt. (The shot that just wore off was from the original vet or?). Sorry, I am just a little confused about that.


    • Cocoa
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      We have not seen them but I have called them when I had previous problems and they were so helpful. The shot was from the original vet who spayed them.


    • Wick
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      I’m glad they have given you a good first impression so far Having a good vet relationship is really important. If you have a good relationship and show your dedication to your pet, I feel naturally vets are more likely to be upfront and honest about prognoses, treatment options, etc.. I love Wick’s vet, and I’m devastated I’ll need to find a new one this summer.

      Any information you have that you can inform the new vet about is wise, so past treatments, medications, conditions, etc. that your rabbits have been through with the old vet.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      Okay I will. That was their first vet visit so there isn’t too much to tell her


    • Cocoa
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      I just got off the phone with the vet. They said to call vets near us to ask for them to prescribe it. They offered to give us some but they are too far away to go pick it up. I will let you know what happens


    • Cocoa
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      I have an appointment for tomorrow. They have to do an exam before they give us the meds. We are only doing an exam on Cocoa and then using the meds for both bunnies. I will also buy some critical care from them.


    • Wick
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      Careful with using meds for both. The dosage they decide is based on weight, so you should keep that in mind.

      The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.


    • Cocoa
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      They are the same weight. One of them is like two ounces more but that’s it

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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Bunny won’t eat pellets