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BINKYBUNNY FORUMS

Home Forums BONDING Bonding Struggles – Older Buns

This topic contains 5sd replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Deleted User 1 year ago.

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  • #1321030

    Deleted User
    Participant
    Hello Everyone – I’ll try and make this short and to the point! I need your help

    So, I have a 7 year old male rabbit. Alone for 4/5 years, until we got Lily. Bonded after a few weeks, a bit humpy but that stopped, they fell in love and were amazing together. A few months later, we sadly lost Lily

    After a month, we rescued Bella, 6 years old. Bonded Bugsy & Bella, but I think we did put them together too quickly. Right now we are rebonding them. It has been about a month now and we are having some issues.

    One minute we they are layed together, eating togeter, grooming each other. And then Bugsy starts grunting and getting humpy. They start chasing and Bella wacks his face with her front paws. This has been a cycle for a while now and I don’t know how to go forward. They would be fine if it wasnt for Bugsy being grunting and humpy towards her. He also sprays his urine at her.

    They have both been Neutured a long time ago, so I really don’t know what to do.

     Any advice? Has anyone been in this situation before?

     

    Thank You !


    #1883877

    DanaNM
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    Can you describe what you’ve done so far in your sessions? How long are they, and what is the space like?

    Did they have a fight that caused you to reassess things, or did they just start chasing, grunting, etc?

    I have had an experience where my bonded bunnies started acting weird (less grooming, more chasing, more nipping), and in that case it was due to one of the bunnies having some medical problems that were causing him to not behave normally towards his bunwife. Once we got him fixed up, they were back to normal.

    So I think first step is have both bunnies checked over at the vet (especially teeth!), just to rule that out.


    #1883910

    Deleted User
    Participant
    Hello So we do about 20 – 40 minute sessions. If they are getting on we get to about 40mins. Its a small neutral space, about 2ft x 2ft.

    They don’r really “fight”, the only aggressive thing is when Bugsy tries to hump Bella, she defends herself. But otherwise it us just chasing and grunting. I think he is ok, as he bonded with our last female rabbit fine. The groom, eat together, and snuggle. The only issue is humping from his side :/

     

    I think everything health wise is good as both been to the vets recently


    #1883917

    jerseygirl
    Moderator

    Posted By DanaNM on 10/17/2018 11:23 AM
    Hi there,

    Can you describe what you’ve done so far in your sessions? How long are they, and what is the space like?

    Did they have a fight that caused you to reassess things, or did they just start chasing, grunting, etc?

    I have had an experience where my bonded bunnies started acting weird (less grooming, more chasing, more nipping), and in that case it was due to one of the bunnies having some medical problems that were causing him to not behave normally towards his bunwife. Once we got him fixed up, they were back to normal.

    So I think first step is have both bunnies checked over at the vet (especially teeth!), just to rule that out.

    I very much agree about getting the buns checked out, particularly your boy. There had been quite a few members that reported hormonal behaviours in older, desexed male rabbits. My recently deceased Rumball did. His humpiness started around age 6. He was already bonded to a girl and she was not pleased but was able hop away and go sit in a place where he couldn’t bother her. They never stayed apart long though. She passed away age 6, so he became friends with a larger bunny I was fostering. His humpy behaviour and spraying continued with her but it didn’t cause out right aggression. Often, he’d give up if they moved away. After some time, she didnt even do that! She was bigger and he could never quite mount her properly lol.

    In the week leading up to my having him put to sleep, I’d been treating him with pain med and antibiotic for urinary condition as he was straining to pee. I had thought he had cystitis as there was a little blood one day. During his check up at the vet, he collapsed and I had him put to sleep (he was almost 12years old). The day after when I was sweeping, I found a bladder stone the size of a baby pea. ? I felt awful that I hadn’t known he was dealing with that. He was in high dose if metacam at least…

    Sorry for long story- my point is do have your boy checked out for bladder sludge or stones. It might require an x-ray. I had a conscious x-Ray done for Rumball the year before but nothing was detected then.

    BinkyBunny (the site owner) had a rabbit, Jack, who excessively humped when he was being bonded to a new friend. He was also an older bunny then. They discovered he did have a bladder stone and he had surgery to have it removed. The buns then went on to bond successfully.

    I cannot say if bladder sludge or stones were related to Rumball’s hormonal behaviours- it’s often speculated that it could be due to adrenal or pituitary issue but this can be harder to diagnose. Some owners have found certain medications have helped abate the behaviour for a while.


    #1883921

    DanaNM
    Moderator

    Wow, really interesting Jersey!

    Once medical issues are ruled out, I’ve found that when buns get into a certain pattern in bonding sessions that I want to break, it helps to shake things up a bit. Change locations, make the area bigger, add obstacles (tunnels, hiding spots with at least 2 exits), try stressing, etc. You sessions are also pretty short, do you find that he humps mostly at the start, or it increases during the session?


    #1883982

    Deleted User
    Participant
    Thank you so much for your inforamtion, that helps a lot.

    He was at the vet the other day and everything seemed fine, but I may take him back if nothing changes. Its just so strange, its almost constant. He humps and then rests it off, as it tires him out. The he’s at it again!

    The other night he had one of his little tired out moments where he just heavy breathes and chills out. (He has arthritis in his front paws and this sometimes stresses him out) In that 30 mins him and Bella acted like a bonded couple. Grooming, cuddling etc As soon as he starts humping again it all goes bad Im hoping it just slowly dies down.

     


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