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BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately! Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

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BUNNY 911 – If your rabbit hasn’t eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!  Don’t have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES 

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

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Forum HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Bunny won’t eat pellets RE: Bunny won’t eat pellets


Wick
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It may be helpful to show your mother HRS’ helpful guidelines for finding a good rabbit vet. Some helpful quotes include (http://rabbit.org/faq-how-to-find-a-good-rabbit-vet/):

” …your rabbit’s well being depends upon finding the most experienced veterinary care available. We hope that within another few years, veterinarian schools will begin to understand rabbits well enough so that veterinarians can be properly trained before they run across a rabbit in their practice. The other problem is that veterinarians not trained in rabbit medicine should be responsible enough to refer you to another veterinarian. Instead many just see the green of your money and say to themselves, ‘sure I’m a vet, I can see your pet, after all it’s only a rabbit.’”

“Don’t assume that just because a veterinarian works with breeders or local 4-H clubs, that they are experienced with house rabbits or the medical needs of older rabbits. Unfortunately, such veterinarians often tend to approach rabbits as stock animals rather than as beloved companions. They may never have done a spay or neuter and “treatment” of any difficulty may amount to euthanasia (when dealing with stock or show animals, the financial bottom line may be the primary consideration).”

The answers provided in this discussion are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet. Seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified behaviorist.