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Home Page Forums HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Moving rabbits outdoors RE: Moving rabbits outdoors


vanessa
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I started with outdoor bunnies, and had them outdooWhere I live, winters get down to 5F (-15C). Summers get into the low 100’s F (high 30’s C). During winter, my bunnies nedded no help stayign warm. They didn’t use the heat lamps so I took them away. They dug and played int he snow. I kept them out of the wind and rain, and they were just fine, with un-frozen water, and twice the amount of food as I fed them in summer. BUT… one of them was determined to escape. I had chased her around the neighborhood at least 3 or 4 times. I DEFINITELY didn’t give hem as much attention as I can now that they are indoors. I did see them for probably 3 hours a day since I spend a great deal of time outside, no matter what the weather – but they didn’t get ht epersonal attention they do now. So checking on their health wasn’t as good as it is now. Parasites and diseases are easier to come across outside. Ticks, mosquitos – I couldn’t keep them off the bunnies in summer. And the flies… flystrike… I could tellyou horror stories.I worried about them al summer each year. I gave them frozen bottles of water, but they didn’t use them. They did like to lie on concrete paving stones, and they dug shallow “cold pits” to cool off in. But I was always worried about heat stroke. After bringing them indoors, they are way more confortable, they get so much more atention, and I know I will be able to spot health problems sooner. Rabbits hide their illnesses. While I absolutely did the best I courl for my outdoor bunnies, I soon came to realise that I couldn’t keep them safe from parasites and heat. So I brought them in, and I am very glad I did.