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Home Forums HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Bunny won’t eat pellets

Viewing 23 posts - 76 through 98 (of 98 total)
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  • #1859281
    Cocoa
    Participant

    Did this work?


    #1859282
    Cocoa
    Participant

    Also, should I limit the lettuce? Today that is the only thing either of them will eat on their own


    #1859284
    Deleted User
    Participant

    I can see the photo. The site looks fine to me. It doesn’t look like their any leakage or pus. I have two boys, so I know what an infected neuter looks like, not really a spay site. If there’s any foul odor, then you might want to get them checked for infection. I wouldn’t limit lettuce if it’s the only thing they’re eating, the important thing is to keep them eating anything. Give them a handful of lettuce every 3-4 hours to make sure they are eating. When Bombur’s neuter was infected, the only thing he would eat was parsley. Along with Critical Care, I gave him a few sprigs of parsley every few hours.


    #1859285
    Wick
    Moderator

    The image works, yay! Unfortunately, Wick is a male so I only know about neuters… quite uninformed about how a female is supposed to look, but on an uneducated positive note, it doesn’t look infected (puss or leaking discharge) or irritated (swollen) from what I can tell. There looks to be some dried blood near the bottom, but Wick came home with dried blood that he eventually groomed off himself.

    Hopefully female pet rabbit owners can chime in soon with their feedback!

    …. What fluffy white fur

    In regards to eating, whatever they’ll eat, I think you should offer so they don’t become malnourished. They need food so they have the strength to recover! In addition to offering what you know they’ll take, continue to attempt to offer hay and pellets so when they’re ready to eat them, they can. For the hay, maybe keep presented fresh hay, rather than presenting the same stack. Fresh hay tends to be more potent in scent (the hay from the bag, not sitting out already), and sometimes that’s more appetizing. If you find they will eat bits of hay, definitely keep encouraging that by cycling hay so they can comb through and find through and find the pieces they’re willing to eat!


    #1859287
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I am having a really hard time getting her Cocoa to eat from a syringe. I was only able to get her to eat a mashed banana with a little mash mixed in through a syringe. I have changed hay a few times, Cocoa ate about three strands. Should I buy some critical care?


    #1859288
    Cocoa
    Participant

    Since the mash is mostly water how much should I feed them?


    #1859291
    Deleted User
    Participant

    I would, just because it has the nutrients they need, if they won’t eat anything else. Another thing you can do, which worked wonders for Bombur, is to mix the banana and pellet mash together and leave it in the cage. Bombur surprised me and ate it overnight. If you leave it, eventually she could be enticed to eat some on her own.


    #1859292
    Wick
    Moderator

    Critical care would be a good idea because it has a good nutritional balance, and it’s meant for rabbits who are recovering from something who cannot eat normally due to post-op conditions.

    You can purchase it on Amazon, with Prime for pretty cheap so you and your mom don’t have to travel anywhere. It would be good to have on hand for the future regardless of whether you use it now or later. http://www.amazon.com/Oxbow-Critical-Apple-Banana-Supplement/dp/B001FKACXO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520363070&sr=8-2&keywords=critical+care+rabbits

    If you can try to get the mash to be less water, that’d be good. I know it can be tough to get through a syringe, but maybe they may lick it off your finger or a spoon.

    I forget if you’ve tried this already, but a mash made from their pellets (soak in water, mash) may be more nutritious than just a banana mash. Maybe throw in some soaked pellets to add some more nutrition.

    Even though it’s a lot of water, at most, they’ll probably just pee a lot. It’s mainly important that they’re getting calories in their body. I’d say set aside at least 3 times per day to sit down and just feed them as much as they’re willing to take. Once they’re full, they won’t let you feed it to them anymore.


    #1859294
    Bam
    Moderator

    The incision looks good, as A & B says. Thank you Wick for the helpful screenshot instruction!

    You can feed the pellets mash in small portions 3-5 times a day. It’s great that she ate a few strands of hay, that’s actually really great.

    Sometimes you need to customize a feeding syringe and make the hole bigger with a knife. I like using small syringes (1 ml) but I always saw the tip off the syringe with a bread knife or the pellet mash/Critical Care won’t go through. And do put a small plate with some mash + banana on it, some buns are reluctant at first but if they venture to have a taste they can often not resist to gobble up the whole thing. What she eats now is less important than that she eats something.


    #1859308
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I have tried regular mash and mixing in banana. Cocoa wont eat it. We are going to the vet this afternoon if they haven’t eaten. I am going to buy the critical care. I was barely even able to get Cocoa to eat just mashed banana. Lily is actually starting to use her litterbox I will continue feeding them whatever they will eat until this afternoon because then they will either be eating on their own or we are going to a vet. Not the same vet who did the surgery though


    #1859310
    Deleted User
    Participant

    That’s why it still might be a good idea to leave the mash in her cage rather than force feeding. eventually she might be enticed by the smell or even be hungry enough to try to eat it on her own. But definitely do pellets mixed with banana and water, so she gets all her nutrients. I’m glad you’re going to take them to the vet though. Especially in this case, a second opinion will be good. Make sure to ask for Metacam.
    Where in Texas are you located? Member Rain also lives in Texas, and she has seen a decent vet I believe. Maybe she’ll be able to help with finding a good vet.


    #1859311
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I found a different vet and I made sure they are extremely experienced with rabbits and know what they are talking about. I left the food in their cage last night and they didn’t eat. I cleaned out their bowls and gave them some fresh mash and they haven’t touched it. I was able to look at the receipt and the vet gave them each a shot of metacam that lasts 24 hours so it wore off an hour ago


    #1859313
    Deleted User
    Participant

    It’s good you found a better vet. The syringe version of metacam works wonderfully, especially in those first few days. The vet should also have Critical Care available to give you as well. At least mine does, so it’s worth asking.  Fingers crossed the vet can help them!


    #1859315
    Wick
    Moderator

    Yes yes, the vet may have critical care they can sell to you so you can have it more quickly. If you only have one small syringe, you can also try asking for a larger syringe/syringes so it’s easier for you to feed mash/critical care. If given the option, typically rabbits like the apple&banana (green and silver) critical care over the original flavor.


    #1859316
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I will ask for the critical care. Thank you! I will let you know what happens


    #1859319
    BinkyBunny
    Keymaster

    I am just seeing all of this now, and… and wow…Cocoa, I am impressed. You really are doing so well under all the pressure and being pulled in different directions. I understand why your mom would trust the vet and breeder before us. When you can talk and see people face to face, it does build a level of trust, where the net can be filled with so much misinformation. So it’s understandable that she is skeptical as she also wants the best outcome too – She wouldn’t want to see you hurt if things didn’t turn out right, and so I am sure she is doing what she feels is best. And you are too, and your perseverance to continue to weed through all the information, from breeder, vet, mom, net articles, this forum, etc etc, seek out a vet that you trust to help insure the best recovery is outstanding. Your mom sure did an amazing job with you – Even if you may not see eye to eye right now.

    Spays are more invasive than neuters, and so it does take time for your females to heal. They may feel lousy for a few days. You may be feeding them by hand for a few days (even with pain meds if you can get them from the new vet). Hydration is very important to keep the gut going too. Hand feeding greens can be helpful. Also, breaking off the greens, like cilantro, mint, parsley etc can release their strong scent and entice them to eat. Also, if/when you end up feeding the critical care, not making it too thick will helpful — One vet tech told me to make it the texture of Tomato soup.

    So when you said you found a new vet — have you seen that one yet, or you just found and are getting an appt. (The shot that just wore off was from the original vet or?). Sorry, I am just a little confused about that.


    #1859320
    Cocoa
    Participant

    We have not seen them but I have called them when I had previous problems and they were so helpful. The shot was from the original vet who spayed them.


    #1859322
    Wick
    Moderator

    I’m glad they have given you a good first impression so far Having a good vet relationship is really important. If you have a good relationship and show your dedication to your pet, I feel naturally vets are more likely to be upfront and honest about prognoses, treatment options, etc.. I love Wick’s vet, and I’m devastated I’ll need to find a new one this summer.

    Any information you have that you can inform the new vet about is wise, so past treatments, medications, conditions, etc. that your rabbits have been through with the old vet.


    #1859323
    Cocoa
    Participant

    Okay I will. That was their first vet visit so there isn’t too much to tell her


    #1859330
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I just got off the phone with the vet. They said to call vets near us to ask for them to prescribe it. They offered to give us some but they are too far away to go pick it up. I will let you know what happens


    #1859338
    Cocoa
    Participant

    I have an appointment for tomorrow. They have to do an exam before they give us the meds. We are only doing an exam on Cocoa and then using the meds for both bunnies. I will also buy some critical care from them.


    #1859340
    Wick
    Moderator

    Careful with using meds for both. The dosage they decide is based on weight, so you should keep that in mind.


    #1859342
    Cocoa
    Participant

    They are the same weight. One of them is like two ounces more but that’s it


Viewing 23 posts - 76 through 98 (of 98 total)
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