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Home Page Forums HOUSE RABBIT Q & A Questions on Litter Training and Food~ RE: Questions on Litter Training and Food~


Azerane
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Well you can absorb pee from the blankets using paper towel and still pop that in the litter box. You can also spray fleece with the vinegar water mix and then soak it up with more paper towel. Removing the blanket during litter training may also help if you wanted to do that.

Carrots so early on may not be such a good idea, carrots are considered a treat food as they are high in sugar. For daily veggies leafy greens are better. I personally wouldn’t feed bread at all. With rabbits it’s also important not to add large amounts of any new food suddenly as it can cause gut upsets, especially in younger rabbits when their gut flora is still getting properly established.

Rabbits don’t need salt licks, they’re more of a novelty item than anything. Pet stores sell many things that aren’t suitable for pets, rabbits included. Corn is dangerous due to the fact that when eaten the hull of the kernels is not digestible and can cause blockages. Corn flavour I expect would not have that issue.

Outside/inside rabbits aren’t terribly different. They both require the same diet, while outside rabbits may get to eat more grass and vegetation, the basic care is still the same and some people still litter train their outdoor rabbits.