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BUNNY 911 - If your rabbit hasn't eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!
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The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

 

 

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Last Post by LittlePuffyTail at 8/30/2012 1:02 AM (3 Replies)
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User is Offline britt and yeti
Edmonton, AB
207 posts Send Private Message
8/29/2012 11:50 AM

I've been reading lots about everyones buns going in for dental work and it makes me wonder

when Yeti went in for his general check up and neuter the vet stated that his teeth are BEAUTIFUL, straight and all around perfect.

my main question is.. with everyones buns needing dental.. should i worry that SOMETIME in the future he'll need some too?  or do buns with straight healthy teeth live their life that way? (as long as there is no trauma of course)

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User is Offline Kokaneeandkahlua
Edmonton, Alberta; Canada
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8/29/2012 3:12 PM
Well it can happen, Noots teeth were great, and then he broke his top incisors-likely they overgrew and were weak maybe? So they can be prone to it, but they can also develop them as they age. My understanding is small rabbits are more prone but I'm sure that's not always teh case either. Those annual checkups will help you stay on top if anything should change.
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User is Offline britt and yeti
Edmonton, AB
207 posts Send Private Message
8/29/2012 4:28 PM

alrighty.

question. i see you're in edmonton and im thinking of switching vets.. could you recommend a couple for me?

im a really nervous about who knows what.. i know to look for exotic but there seems to be a lot out here. 

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User is Offline LittlePuffyTail
New Brunswick, Canada
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8/30/2012 1:02 AM
I have read that lops and dwarf bunnies tend to be more pre-disposed to dental problems because of the shape of their face. If you have a bunny that lives to be an old bun, there is a good chance he or she will, at some time, need some sort of dental work. The most common are dental spurs and malocclusion but bunnies can also get tooth root infections, abscesses and broken teeth.

It's important to be vigilant for signs of dental problems such as drooling, weight loss and difficulty eating.
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