Friday, April 18, 2014 Register
 

Forum

BUNNY 911 - If your rabbit hasn't eaten or pooped in 12-24 hours, call a vet immediately!
Don't have a vet? Check out VET RESOURCES

 

The subject of intentional breeding or meat rabbits is prohibited. The answers provided on this board are for general guideline purposes only. The information is not intended to diagnose or treat your pet.  It is your responsibility to assess the information being given and seek professional advice/second opinion from your veterinarian and/or qualified behaviorist.

 

 

LEADERS:  Beka27   BinkyBunny   Elrohwen   KokaneeandKahlua   LittlePuffyTail  MoveDiagonally  RabbitPam   Sarita

 

You must login and be verified to post, reply, and view profiles
Last Post by Beka27 at 10/05/2010 1:07 AM (23 Replies)
You are not authorized to post a reply or you have not verified your email address.
Printer Friendly
Page 1 of 212 > >>
Sort:
Author Messages Resolved

User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 12:25 AM

 I know most people that here house their bunnies inside. Here in Aus, the weather can get very hot but inside just is not an option.My parents think that bunnies stink, when actually they don't! I don't have any bunnies yet but I want to make sure that my rabbits reach their full potential and are overall, happy and healthy. What would you deem acceptable and just too small. As for the weather, I can sew a cover made of tarp. The hutch needs to have an easily accessible bottom so I can clean it. Also, how did you acquire your bunny's housing?

 

-Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover


User is Offline Petzy
Northern AB Canada
Forum Leader
5938 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 3:52 AM
How many rabbits are you planning on acquiring?
Photobucket "what happened? did something happen or can I just go back to my hay?"

User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 4:14 AM
I want a happy bunny and I don't want it to be lonely so 2!

User is Offline Petzy
Northern AB Canada
Forum Leader
5938 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 4:40 AM
I agree, an outdoor rabbit is likely to get lonely. Make sure you get the rabbits altered as soon as they reach maturity so they won't reproduce or fight, this includes spaying for two females even.

You are right, BinkyBunny.com is an indoor rabbit community so we don't believe in round-the-clock outdoor rabbit housing.

I can tell you, though, what I did for my rabbits' outdoor play pen that I use in the daytime on nice days.

You must find out, if you don't already know, the predator situation in your area. What type of animals come through your yard that might attack your rabbits? Weasels are very skilled at rabbit-killing for example and will squeeze through very small spaces. Also, keep in mind that outdoor rabbits can get very stressed if a predator is trying to work its way inside their enclosure, so you would want to go maximum-security with the enclosure and make it predator-proof. Most mesh-type fencing material is not safe as most small carnivores can climb it easily. I used siding material to build my play pen but in a hot climate this would exacerbate the heat you are trying to protect your rabbits from as it is made of metal. I would go with a heat-deflecting smooth material for the walls, and if your rabbits will be living in it full-time, it should give ample room for running and binkies. My enclosure is 12' by 12'. The enclosure must have a top to keep the rabbits hidden from birds. In addition, there has to be a shelter from rain like a hutch. This should be roomy also if you are planning on locking the rabbits up in it at night for safety. Larger is always better in a hot climate especially, so cost will be your determining factor. As well, if your rabbits go outside, they will need parasite-prevention such as Revolution which you can get from a vet when you get them their vaccines. If mosquitoes or other blood-sucking insects, are abundant your rabbits will suffer and may need to be placed in a screened cage or similar for those hours. Keeping outdoor rabbits healthyl is hard work, more work than indooor rabbits because they are so exposed outside.

Do you have a garage or basement where your rabbits would be cooler and safer? There are methods to keep a rabbit cool inside a house other than A/C. May members on here battle the heat with their bunnies and use refrigerated tiles for example or frozen water bottles for their rabbits to get cooled off. There are better ways than to place the rabbits outdoors.
Photobucket "what happened? did something happen or can I just go back to my hay?"

User is Offline Karla
1600 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 5:20 AM
I can only tell you what we did with the outdoor bunny I had as a kid as the ones I have today are house bunnies: Our whole garden was fenced with poultry wire and then my dad built a big pen with roof on and with wood panels on 2 of the sides and chicken wire on the two other sides, so that there was no draft. Furthermore, there was plexi glas on one of the wired sides, so the bunny wouldn't get wet from the rain. The pen was really big because it was something like 2,5m high and 2,5m wide.

The flooring was outdoor tiles and then we had big boxes with tons of hay for digging and hidding. She did her pooping in the boxes, so about once or twice a month I changed the bedding and the hay.

At night time my bunny was kept in this pen, but during the day she had access to the whole garden.

Of course, I live in a place where the outdoor bunnies have no predators to worry about as such, so I don't know if you can let your bunny out without supervision in the garden.

One thing though, I must say, is that it is important that there are hiding places from birds. Where I lived before, we had problems with the magpies harrassing my bunnies when they were out. Although they were not harming them, the bunnies were clearly very scared.

I don't feel the same way about outdoor bunnies as I know most members do here, because I rather want my bunnies to live a short life outside than a long one in which they have never enjoyed digging in the ground, feeling the sun and enjoying the breeze and the many smells, but I will also tell you that my outdoor bunny never lived long (max. 2 years). She was not killed by predators though, but perhaps she could have been saved, if she had lived indoors where I could have kept a close eye on her health...

Finally, I just want to add that I am very happy to hear that you want two bunnies. Outdoor bunnies should never live alone...that is just too sad a life, in my opinion.

User is Offline jerseygirl
Australia
14382 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 7:34 AM
Welcome Lil_Miss_Bun_Lover.

It would be so much better if you can get your parents on board about having rabbits indoors. I'd keep working on that!
If you plan on getting 2, maybe look at adopting and already bonded pair. Also, these rabbits are usually already desexed so that is one less cost, plus it helps with odours.

The heat is not the only concern for outdoor bunnies in Australia. They are at risk of contracting calici virus and myxomatosis. They can be vaccinated against calici but not myxo unfortunately.

User is Offline Beka27
Cleveland, Ohio (USA)
Forum Leader
15468 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 10:47 AM
It's possible to have rabbits outside, but I don't believe you'll get the same amount of joy from having them in that way. Maybe at first when they are new, but after awhile, when the novelty wears off and you have to clean and feed and socialize with them in all types of bad weather, you may not think it was the best idea.

My recommendation is to hang around our site, learn all you can about rabbits, their care requirements, health issues that can arise. And when the time is right (when you are able to house them indoors, either in your parent's home or your own home), THEN you can work on welcoming one into your life. If you cannot have them in the house just yet, I would wait until you can.
Meadow..... Photobucket ...... Max, my angel bunny

User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 3:47 PM
@Petzy & Jerseygirl, there are no weazles in Australia but there are foxes. Thankfully there are no foxes in my suburban area! I know not to buy a rabbit from a petstore because they do not keep rabbits in very good conditions (The closest one doesn't even separate the boys and the girls) So I will buy a bonded pair from the RSPCA. They also vaccinate and spay/neuter every bunny! I would absolutely love two but what happens if their best bud dies from old age? I can't just replace their friend and I will face that dilemma no matter what number of bunnies I get. I will try to convince my parents to let them sleep inside in an x-pen and let them play outside in a run. Also beka27, I would have to wait 7 years until I am able to get a rabbit to keep inside. My parents know I will litter-train them but they just aren't sold. Also an x-pen would cost less than an outdoor hutch so I'll try that.

-Thanks, keep the suggestions coming. Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover

User is Offline BB
San Francisco Area
Forum Leader
8643 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 5:11 PM
Posted By Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover on 09/27/2010 06:47 PM 
I would have to wait 7 years until I am able to get a rabbit to keep inside. My parents know I will litter-train them but they just aren't sold. Also an x-pen would cost less than an outdoor hutch so I'll try that. 

You are welcome to invite your parents to check out the site and to also post here as we can address their concerns directly too.  Though there are young people here, there are alot more older members, some of which are parents themselves.  The biggest challenge we've had is when kids are allowed to have a rabbit but the parent isn't fully prepared, and so later down the line it can be hard on everyone.  It's a good idea to get them involved in this "education" process if they are willing.


User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 6:37 PM
Please rest assured that I will take on ownership with as much maturity as any other adult. I will make sure that everything is ready for a rabbit and that I am ready. I'd never do anything risky at the sake of an animal.

-Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover

User is Offline Nibbles_NZ
773 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 6:57 PM
Also consider the cost of having rabbits. A lot of people are surprised to find out how much it costs. The Vet bills are higher, they require lots of veggies everyday, a quality pellet is not cheap, especially for 2 rabbits, the litter cost money and they go through it. They have to have unlimited hay and will eat a lot of it. My two rabbits have cost me a lot of money. Are your parents will willing to pay for vet bills and everything needed for the rabbits? My rabbits cost me around $130 per month. That is not counting the vet bills. I've spent well over $400 at the vets office. My rabbits are only 6 and 8 months old.

User is Offline jerseygirl
Australia
14382 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 7:25 PM Accepted Answer

It's good you're getting prepared beforehand.

If it does end up that they are housed outdoors, maybe you can compromise and have them up near the house, on a verandah, annexed room or garage. That will offer some protection and they'll be less isolated. Out door habitats need a sheltered side but not be completely enclosed. There needs to be some air flow. I saw a habitat in a catalogue here that was called a "Bunny Mansion". Metal cage with metal box at one end. Ugh! Talk about an oven! I want to go to these stores and put warnings on the product.

I used to think foxes were a non issue too until I lost one of my chickens. I was surprised as I too am in suburban area. Other risks are large birds, and even stray cats or dogs. The might not directly attack but can frighten a rabbit enough that is have a heart attack or injure itself in trying to escape, even within it's enclosure. These are just potential things that *can* happen, not saying they're always at risk, just things to consider when providing an outdoor hutch and it's location.

If you get an pair of bunnies, they might already be accustomed to living outdoors and the transistion won't be a big deal. Besides the RSPCA, there are rabbit rescues. Here, they are normally run privately out of peoples homes. Some rabbits are out in foster care also. So this might be an opportunity for your parents to see a rabbit set-up within the home.

As Nibbles-NZ mentioned, look carefully at cost and find a rabbit vet in your area to get an idea of what fees will be. If you have an allowance or job that gives you some income, then you'll be able to contribute to the costs. If not, make sure your parents are aware beforehand.
I know it might sound like we're bringing up alot of negative issues but it's just some of the things many of us wish we knew before. You're in a really good position to learn a lot in preparation instead of learning on the run like I did.


User is Offline Karla
1600 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 7:42 PM
Posted By Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover on 09/27/2010 06:47 PM
I would absolutely love two but what happens if their best bud dies from old age? I can't just replace their friend and I will face that dilemma no matter what number of bunnies I get. I will try to convince my parents to let them sleep inside in an x-pen and let them play outside in a run. Also beka27, I would have to wait 7 years until I am able to get a rabbit to keep inside. My parents know I will litter-train them but they just aren't sold. Also an x-pen would cost less than an outdoor hutch so I'll try that.

-Thanks, keep the suggestions coming. Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover

Seeing you are planning to have outdoor bunnies, you really need to make sure that you always have two bunnies - or more. Perhaps you can see if there is a bonded trio?

Thing is that rabbits are very social creatures. They live in large groups in the wild, because this is the way they can protect themselves against predators and because of their need for social grooming et.c. Let's say you only get one or you get two, and one of them dies, the lonely bunny in the garden will always be alert and on the look-out for predators. It will not only be a lonely life, but it will be a life of fear. The bunny's instincts will tell it, that it is constantly at great risk of being eaten, because there is no one else there to warn it against predators.

Some pets like guinea pigs are never sold - where I live - to people who intend to keep only one. I think the same should apply for bunnies.

As I mentioned, I have had an outdoor bunny who lived on its own. She used to sit by the window looking in on us, and it was so sad to see her like this. She was such a lonely bunny. I know from other people who have free-roaming outdoor bunnies that these bunnies thump all the time - they are constantly scared even though there are no actual predators here. But they don't know.

I hope you can convince your parents to let you have your bunnies inside. The thing is that I have never had a close relationship to my outdoor bunnies although I loved them deeply and I considered them my best friends at that time. But honestly, it does get tiresome to have to go out in the garden and sit every day for a couple of hours (okay, so you live in Australia where the weather is nice, so perhaps it is not such a big problem as it is here).

And yes, bunnies are expensive (mine are at least), so do get a bunny because you love bunnies and their personalities, and not because your parents think that this will be a cheap and easy pet. Honestly, my bunnies require much more time and effort than does my cat. They are not as expensive as my dog (who is always in and out of the vet hospital), but almost.

Don't you think you could convince your parents to have them in your room at night and then outside during the day? If you could, just make sure that the pen is really big. Bunnies are active animals who need space to do binkies and to stretch out.


User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 7:45 PM
@jerseygirl I'm sorry, what's an annexe room, LOL? The bunny mansion reminds me of something I saw at 'cheap as chips' when I was looking for a witch's broomstick. It was tiny! It had a metal floor AND it was only about 50cm x 30cm big! Poor bunny would die of heat stroke! I agree, I still have some things to learn. I have no idea how to contact a rabbit rescue as I don't know any. The vet fees will lower a bit as I'm sure a lot of animal shelters/rabbit rescues vaccinate and spay/ neuter. We have a veranda just outside the door and it would not be acceptable for them to be at the edge of the garden. It just would NOT do. I did have a rabbit when I was very young. My brother's kept getting out from under the hutch and eating the spinach so it's not a good idea to have them there. Sadly, they died when we were on holiday and the sitters knew nothing about rabbits. I want to grow some organic vegetables in my garden. If anyone has a patch, what should I grow?

-Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover

User is Offline jerseygirl
Australia
14382 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 7:58 PM

An annexe is an added room. Not part of the main house. Like a granny-flat. Sometimes called a sleep-out.

It was that store catalogue where I saw that hutch.

For veggies you can grow leafy lettuce varieties, carrots (they love the tops), lots of herbs. Check out the diet section at this site for more inspiration. Though some of the things use American terms but an online search will help provide the other names.

If you're happy to post what State you're in I might be able to suggest some rescues to look into.


User is Offline Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover
26 posts Send Private Message
9/27/2010 8:05 PM
Well, I sort of have an annexe room but I think the noises from outside will make them paranoid...

User is Offline aims
sydney, AU
51 posts Send Private Message
9/29/2010 7:39 PM

Hi all,

been reading this thread with interest. I recently got two bunnies (as of yet unbonded), one is living on my balcony and the other in the hutch in the backyard (where i plan to move both of them once bonded). when i am home i let both of them have (seperate) indoor time so they can be a part of the family life.

so they come inside for several hours each night, and then when i go to bed i put them back in their respective outdoor (and mosquito proof) areas.

the predator factor is minimal - i have only ever seen a cat in our backyard a couple of times and some magpies in the trees. but the bunnies have safe areas they can hide in so they can't be seen by predators.

so what do you all think about this living situation? will my bunnies be happy coming indoors when i'm there for several hours each day, or do they really need to be inside all the  time, even when i'm at work or sleeping?

Photobucket Photobucket

User is Offline LoveChaCha
Rabbit Warren
6568 posts Send Private Message
9/29/2010 9:14 PM
Aims,

It depends on your situation and living quarters.

A lot of the bunny parents, including myself, have bunnies that are strictly indoor house rabbits.

If you do have them indoors, do you have a place for them to be? You can sure make a nice home for them in the house- made of an x-pen and/or grids. I wouldn't recommend the bedroom as a place to keep your bunnies, as bunnies like to be more active at night
PhotobucketPhotobucket85207e9097ee11e18cf91231380fd29b_6

User is Offline Beka27
Cleveland, Ohio (USA)
Forum Leader
15468 posts Send Private Message
9/30/2010 12:21 AM
Aims, we recognize that different parts of the world house rabbits differently. In the UK for example, it's not uncommon for people to have "garden rabbits". I'm concerned about the mosquito situation. I don't know A LOT about Myxi (as it isn't something we really need to deal with in the US), but from what I've heard, it's a very nasty disease. If you were able to figure a way for them to live indoors full time, with maybe limited playtime outside in a bunny-proofed pen when mosquitoes are not a threat, I think both you and them would be very happy. One of the joys of having rabbits indoors is you get to see their behaviors at all times of the day and night. You learn their routines, and they have more freedom in terms of integrating into the household in the same way a dog or cat would.

Obviously, we are a house rabbit community and we advocate indoor living. Some people allow their buns to play outdoors, some do not. There is also the risk of a rabbit bringing fleas or other parasites into the house. Stick around and ask any questions you might have. We want you to make educated decisions about what is best for your family.
Meadow..... Photobucket ...... Max, my angel bunny

User is Offline Kax0r
76 posts Send Private Message
9/30/2010 1:18 PM
Posted By on 09/27/2010 03:25 AM

 I know most people that here house their bunnies inside. Here in Aus, the weather can get very hot but inside just is not an option.My parents think that bunnies stink, when actually they don't! I don't have any bunnies yet but I want to make sure that my rabbits reach their full potential and are overall, happy and healthy. What would you deem acceptable and just too small. As for the weather, I can sew a cover made of tarp. The hutch needs to have an easily accessible bottom so I can clean it. Also, how did you acquire your bunny's housing?

 

-Lil_Miss_Bunny_Lover

 

HAHA! Don't stink- ever smelled a litter box after a few days? They don't just $*&! rainbows.

Proud father of Peanut "Ol' Nutters" the blind
You are not authorized to post a reply or you have not verified your email address.
Page 1 of 212 > >>


SaveABunny Rescue
You agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy by using this website.
Copyright 2006-2012 BinkyBunny.com - All Rights Reserved